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deflector 

Class of '47 



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PROPERTY OF THE 

TUFTS LIBRARY 

WEYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 

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4 

REFLECTOR 
...1947... 



THE TUFTS UBRAM 
V/EYWOUTH, MASS. 




Published by Students of Weymouth High School 
Weymouth, Massachusei is 



DEDICATION 



In recognition of the years of faithful 
and untiring co-operation in printing our 
school paper, the Reflector, we, the Class 
of 1947, wish to dedicate our year book 
to Mr. Harry F. Duncan, Instructor of 
Printing in the Weymouth Vocational 
School. 



Four Year High Honors 



Nancy Cain 
Anthony James Daniele 
Charles Forsyth Hastie 
Sally Erna Mathews 

Phylis Ann 



Jean Lorraine Nash 
Karin Henrietta Thornberg 
Patricia Ann Weeks 
Patricia Williams 
Williams 



Four Year Honors 



Marilyn Gertude Alley 
Barbara Jean Baird 
Jean Marie Bentley 
Nancy Ann Brda 
Karl Layng Briggs, Jr. 
Shirley Priscilla Carlson 
Jean Barbara Chase 
Everett Franklin Dow, Jr. 
Evelyn Lois Forest 
Margaret Phyliss Giovanucci 
William Francis Leone 

Mahlon Jesse Wc 



James Joseph McCarthy, Jr. 
George James McCue 
Barbara Ann Messier 
Jeanne Marie Norve 
George Robert O'Neill 
Gordon Howard Rauch 
Shirley Carol Savola 
William Charles Stephenson 
Francis Melvin Walsh 
Robert Bicknell Warren 
Joseph Frederick Wolfert 
)d, Jr. 



Veterans of World War II who have completed require' 
merits for a Weymouth High School diploma during the 
school year 1946-1947 



Class of 

Thomas Edward Amos 1944 

Warren Hartwell Andersen 1944 

George Arthur Bailey 1941 

Donald Clapp Bishop 1944 

Roy Allen Brigham 1945 

Walter Dudley Bullard 1944 

Edwin Frank Burnett 1945 

Charles Joseph Casey, Jr. 1941 

Robert Francis Clark 1946 

Richard Paul Connolly 1946 

Robert Ernest Cote 1943 

Charles Albert Faulds 1942 

Cornelius Donald Flynn 1946 

John Joseph Kcrwin, Jr. 1945 



William Paul Luscombe, Jr. 
James Gillian MacAlpine, Jr 
Richard Wyoming Mell 
Donald Harold Miller 
David West Paulson 
Thomas Ray Pearson 
Conrad Petersen, Jr. 
Robert Edwin Pierce 
Arthur John Sewell 
Edward Raymond Silva 
William Charles Stephenson 
Harmon Dean Tompkins 
Mahlon Jesse Wood, Jr. 
Edmund Henry Wright, Jr. 



Class of 
1946 
1943 
1943 
1945 
1945 
1942 
1943 
1943 
1945 
1944 
1943 
1942 
1944 
1944 



Contents 



Dedication 5 

Fout-'Year Honor Roll 6 

Faculty 3 

Class Census 1 J 

Class Officers 12 

Vocational Officers 13 

The Perfect Senior 14 

Class History 15 

Class Prophecy 21 

Senior Who's Who 3 1 

High Honor Essays 57 

Class Activities 55 

Class Will 83 

Advertisements 35 




Page Eight f^V, 



FACULTY 



WALLACE L. WHITTLE, Principal 

We value him as a leader, but more as a friend. 

THOMAS A. LYONS, Assistant Principal, 
Mathematics 
"A friend in need is a friend indeed." 

FRANCIS E. WHIPPLE, Director of Vocational 
School 

Few things are impossible to diligence and skill. 

RAY G. PARKER. Assistant Director of 
Ideational School 
True to his work and his friends. 

HILMER NELSON, Head of Department of 
Agriculture 

To be friendly in character is the best one 
can be. 

RUTH E. ANDERSON (MRS.) , Secretary 
Always cheerful, always kind, 
Another like her we'll never find. 

DOROTHY COREY, Assistant Secretary 
Lovely to look at, 
Lovely to know. 

MARION R. FOR TIER, Secretary of Vocational 
School 

Her pleasant nature endears her to the hearts 
of all. 

LEWIS H. BACON, JR., Auto Mechanics 
Actions speak louder than words. 

ESTHER L. BENSON, Home Economics 

Efficiency is her right hand. 
JAMES F. BOLAND, Sheet Metal, Mathematics 

Accuracy is his password. 

PRESCOTT B. BROWN, English 
"Ur was an ancient city in Asia." 

ERNESTINE R. CANNING, French 
"J'aime mon francais." 

HAROLD E. CLARKE, Sheet Metal 

Knowledge and diligence is always in mind. 

PAUL C. CLEAVES, English 
For three years he's been away, 
But now we hope he's back to stay. 



ANNE M. DARLING (MRS.), Ancient History, 
English 

Best wishes and success at Weymouth High. 

JOHN K. DELAHUNT, Economics, Science 
He's always carefree and gay, 
That explains his winning way. 

HARRY F. DUNCAN, Printing 

A perfect fellow is he who makes business an 
amusement. 

WILLIAM H. ERWIN, Ancient History, Social 
Science 
A friend to all. 

ALICE K. FAY, Commercial 

Always ready with a helping hand. 

EDNA G. FLAHERTY, Assistant Director of 
Guidance Dept. 
Good nature sparkles in her eyes. 

JOHN T. GANNON, Latin 
It is good to be merry and wise. 

JOHN T. GHIORSE, Aviation, Mathematics 
A ready smile and a brilliant mind, 
Always cheerful, always kind. 

MARIE K. GHIORSE, English, Mathematics, 
Science, Social Science 
Ready, willing, able. 

MARY L. GLOSTER, Librarian 
Patience is a virtue. 

WALTER C. GUTTERSON, Director of 
Guidance Department 
Personality along with confidence helps make a 
man a success. 

OLIVE E. HACKETT, Commercial 
Always bright and sunny. 

FREDERICK H. HOYLE, Auto Mechanics 
Personality helps a man to success. 

LEO A. HAYES, Physical Education 
"That reminds me of a joke." 

LILLIAN JEFTS, Spanish 

A willing heart finds nothing impossible. 



IN THE PHOTOGRAPH ON LEFT-HAND PAGE 

First Row (left to right): Lillian Jefts, Kathryn Moats, Ray Parker, Francis Whipple, Wallace Whittle, 
Thomas Lyons, Dorothy Corey, Edna Flaherty; Second Row: Alice White, Helen Lyons, Eva Skala, Ruth Mayo, 
Mary Toomey, Marie Ghiorse, Mary McMorrow, Ruth Anderson, Dorothy Pearson, Margaret Langford, Ethel 
MacDougall, Elizabeth Palmer. Esther Benson, Martha Vining. Olive Hackett, Anita Petrucci; Third Row: 
Alice Fay, Helen Norris. Jean Young, Anne Darling, Marion Fortier, Mary Gloster. Evelyn Silvester. Ernestine 
Canning, Dorothy Murphy, Taimi Salo, Dorothy MacGregor, Helena Reidy; Fourth Row: Prescott Brown, 
Arthur Scott, Walter Gutterson, Lewis Bacon. George Klay, Harry Duncan, Hilmer Nelson, Otto Mahn. John 
Ghiorse, Alvah Raymond, Waldo Swan, Harold Nelson, George McCarthy. John Delahunt, Clarence Lyond, 
Joseph Whittemore; Fifth Row: William Erwin, Jalmar Nelson, Robert Mitchell, Russell Mazzola, Norman 
Loud, James Steele, Francis Kelly. Frererick Hoyle, Paul Cleaves, Charles Pieper, James Boland, Russell Jack, 
Oral Page, Francis Martin, Leo Hayes. 



c^Vj Page Nine 



GEORGE H. KLAY, Mathematics, Mechanical 
Drawing 

.Someone to turn lo when in doubt. 

FRANCIS X. KELLY, Commercial 
Happy am I; from care I'm free. 
Why aren't I hey all content like me? 

MARGARET K. LANGFORD, Commercial 
Dependability is an admirable quality. 

NORMAN 1). LOUD, Science 

He is wise atrd uses his wisdom well. 

CLARENCE R. LYOND, Science 
Little Johnny took a drink, 
And now he is no more, 
For what he thought was HaO 
Was H2SO4. 

HELEN G. LYONS, Ancient History, English 
It's nice to be natural 
When you're naturally nice. 

ETHEL C. MacDOUGALL, English 
A welcome addition to our faculty. 

DOROTHY G. MacGREGOR, Commercial 
The world means something to the capable. 

OTTO H. MAHN, Citizenship, Mathematics, 
Placement, In-Service Training 
No finer man can be found. 

JOHN F. MARTIN, Social Science 
His duties well performed, bis da)s well spent. 

RUTH E. MAYO, Science 

Don't put oil until tomorrow what you can do 
today. 

RUSSELL H. MAZZOLA, Aviation, Mathematics, 
Science 

Never at a loss for a quick reply. 

G FORGE J. MCCARTHY, Social Science 

His amiable disposition has won him man) 
I riends. 

ROBERT E. MITCHELL, Social Science 
Ambition has no rest. 

MARY E. McMORROW, English, Mathematics 
The secret of success is constancy of purpose. 

KATHRYN H. MOATS (MRS.) , Home 
Economics 

Mote is to be gained from one teacher than 
from two books. 

DOROTHY U. MURPHY, English, Mathematics 
Knowledge is the Inst step on the ladder of 
success. 

HAROLD R. NELSON, Instructor in Agriculture 
His standard is the goal of all. 

JALMAR N. NELSON, Cabinet Making, 
Mathematics, Science 
Everything is fine when he is around. 

VIRGINIA NYE, - (On leave of absence) 
\lw;i\s helpful, always kind: knowledge and 
diligence in mind. 

HELEN N. NORRIS, Commercial 
Met w.i\s arc ways ol pleasantness. 

Page Ten c^V> 



ORAL A. PAGE, Physical Education 
Actions speak louder than words. 

ELIZABETH L. PALMER, English, French, 

Spanish 
"N'est-ce pas?" 

DOROTHY PEARSON, English, Social Science 

Her eyes are laughing, 

Her smile always winning. 
AN1 I A L. PETRUCCI, English, French 

Petite and sweet. 

CH VRLES O. PIEPER, Carpentry 

A true gentleman is what one seldom sees. 

ALVAH RAYMOND, Mathematics 
The master has spoken. 

HELENA F. REIDY. Latin, Social Science 
To be so serene and yet so interminable in 
knowledge. 

FA I MI R. SALO, Physical Education 
Oh, but to be so youthful! 

ARTHUR R. SCOT I . Mathematics, Science 
"W hat do you think about that, class?" 

ROSE SILVERMAN, Commercial 
Small in stature, 
Mighty in vocal power. 

HAROLD C. SHERWOOD, Cabinet Making 
How easy life can be! 

EVELYN SILVESTER, Art 
Art is a necessity of life. 

! \ \ SKALA, Home Economics 
A lovely and efficient woman. 

JAMES F. STEELLE. Social Science 

His patience is everlasting, and he is always 
willing to lend a helping hand. 

HF.RBERTA L. STOCKWELL, Nurse 
A friendly smile, a soothing hand! 

WALDO H. SWAN, Mathematics 
"All right, class: quiet down!" 

MARY F. TOOMEY, English 
She is everyone's friend, and is held high in 
our esteem. 

MAR I I " \ YINING, Latin 
The force of her own merit makes her way. 

ALICE WHITE, English 
Stern and severe, we were told, 
Hut we discovered a heart of gold. 

JOSEPH K. WHITTEMORE, English, History 
Such an interesting person is hard to find. 

HELEN M. WOOD (MRS.) , German 

To be a friend is one of the greatest assets in 
life. 

M JEAN YOUNG, Commercial 
Gentle in manner, firm in reality. 



CLASS CENSUS 



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Most Poni ilar Rov 






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Ivaipn VV aio 


Class Actress 






Beverly Jordan 


Class Heartbreaker 






Henry Boucher 


Most Dependable 






Karin Thornberg 


Most Carefree 






Frederick Loud 


Best Dressed Girl 






Helen Casciani 


Best Dressed Boy 






Warren Porter 


Class Sheik 






John Baumeister 


Woman Hater 






James Duca 


Most Popular With 


The 


Men 


Marion Doyle 


Most Popular With 


The 


Ladies 


William Mcintosh 


Class Poet 






David Resnick 


Class Artist 






Donald Almquist 



c^V. Page Eleven 




Page Twelve *\&-? 




c^V, Page Thirteen 



PERFECT SENIOR 



Girl 

vj 11 1 


Bov 


Hair — Sally Mathews 


Hair — David Resnick 


Eyes — Jean Norve 


Eyes — Henry Boucher 


Smile — Eileen Kezer 


Smile — Anthony DeBosco 


Intellect — Nancy Cain 


Intellect — Anthony Daniele 


Cleverness — Sally Mathews 


Stature — Henry Boucher 


Dignity — Nancy Cain 


Dignity — Anthony Daniele 


Sense of Humor — Rose Bianco 


Humor — Edward Adams 


Disposition — Nancy Dorn 


Disposition — Rex Fenderson 


Voice — Janette Jones 


Voice — Micheal Smith 


Sportsmanship — Barbara Dwyer 


Sportsmanship — Richard Liva 


Friendliness — Nancy Dorn 


Clothes — Warren Porter 


Clothes — Helen Casciani 


Pep — Frederick Loud 


Pep — Barbara Dwyer 


Dependability — Mclvin Walsh 


Trustworthiness — Karin Thornberg 


Naivete — Carl Bcrgfors 


Complexion — Marilyn Holbrook 


Complexion — Carl Briggs 


Figure — Helen Tower 


Brutality — Henry Boucher 



Page Fourteen c^Vj 




c^V, Page Thirteen 



PERFECT SENIOR 



Girl 


Bov 


Hair — Sally Mathews 


Hair — David Resnick 


Eyes — Jean Norve 


Eyes — Henry Boucher 


Smile — Eileen Kezer 


Smile — Anthony DeBosco 


Intellect — Nancy Cain 


Intellect — Anthony Danicle 


Cleverness — Sally Mathews 


Stature — Henry Boucher 


Dignity — Nancy Cain 


Dignity — Anthony Daniele 


Sense of Humor — Rose Bianco 


Humor — Edward Adams 


Disposition — Nancy Dorn 


Disposition — Rex Fenderson 


Voice — Janette Jones 


Voice — Micheal Smith 


Sportsmanship — Barbara Dwyer 


Sportsmanship — Richard Liva 


Friendliness — Nancy Dorn 


Clothes — Warren Porter 


Clothes — Helen Casciani 


Pep — Frederick Loud 


Pep — Barbara Dwyer 


Dependability — Melvin Walsh 


Trustworthiness — Karin Thornberg 


Naivete — Carl Bergfors 


Complexion — Marilyn Holbrook 


Complexion — Carl Briggs 


Figure — Helen Tower 


Brutality — Henry Boucher 



Page Fourteen c^Vj 



■v 




c 



or 

WE VEST YEARS OF OUR LIVES hS^A 




FRESHMEN 




AN AEROPLANE WAS CARTED 
INSIDE THE WALLS OF WEYMOUTH HIGH! 



SOPHOMORE 





THE NEWSPAPERS HAD THE AFFAIR 
OF THE PASSING OF KD.R. 



THE FOOTBALL TEAM RECEIVED THEIR SHARE 
WITH THREE ON THE LEDGER "ALL STAR'." 




WELL ALWAYS REMEMBER THE LAB 

BY ITS GLASSES AND FLASKS FOR HEATIN. 



" AND THE TRACK TEAM CLASS B DID GRAB 
WHILE CROSS COUNTRY REMAINED UNBEATEN. 





TO BE A SENIOR OF GREATEST RENOWN 
WHEN THE TIME GOES ALONG QUIGK, 




JUST ENOUGH TIME TO GET INTO ONES GOWN, 
AND MAKE LIKE "GAZELLE BOY" DICK.' 



before we leave you 
weymouth high ( 

all undergraos, 
vve implore 

i'/e beg you never 
to comply 

in opening Richard's 

J 00 OR • 

Hit 




NOTE : THIS. PAGE WILL LOOK BETTER IF YOU SQUINT YOUfi EYES AND WILL LOOK EVEN BETTER IF YOU CLOSE THEM. 



Page Sixteen c^St, 



or 

THE BEST YEARS OF OUR LIVES ( w V T o H s a a l m l £3$? 





THE FOOTBALL TEAM RECEIVED THEIR SHARE 
WITH THREE ON THE LEDGER "ALL START 




WE'LL ALWAYS REMEMBER THE LAB 
BY ITS GLASSES AND FLASKS FOR HEATIN 



-" AND THE TRACK TEAM CLASS B DID GRAB 
WHILE CROSS COUNTRY REMAINED UNBEATEN. 



SENIOR 




TO BE A SENIOR OF GREATEST RENOWN 
WHEN THE TIME GOES ALONG QUICK 




JUST ENOUGH TIME TO GET INTO ONE'S GOWN, 
AND MAKE LIKE "GAZELLE BOY" DICK; 



BEFORE WE LEAVE YOU 
WEYMOUTH HIGH, 

ALL UNDERGRADS, 
WE IMPLORE 

ViE BEG YOU NEVER 
to comply 

in opening Richard's 

DOOR ? 




NOTE: TMI5 PAGE WILL look better if you squint your eyes and will look even better if you close them. 



Page Sixteen c^V, 



Vol. I, No. 



WEYMOUTH HIGH SCHOOL 



June 19, 1947 



Man About Town 



Airplane "Hits' 



High School 



Class of 1947 Graduates Today 

A capacity audience assembled at the Weymouth High 
School to witness the graduation exercises of the class of '47. 
The day was pleasant as the class, composed of 288 members; 
filed slowly down the long walk led by Class Marshal, David 
Resnick; and class officers Alfred Spence, President; William 
Mcintosh, Vice-President; Nancy Dorn, Secretary; and Fred 
Loud, Treasurer. They were attired in maroon and gold caps 
and gowns— their school colors. The band was led by Mr. Jack 
and consisted of members from all classes, who played stirring 
music throughout the exercises. The welcoming speech was 
given by the president, Alfred Spence, after which the invoca- 
tion was given. Songs were sung by the entire class. Excellent 
speeches were given by several prominent Weymouth people. 
The announcement of those receiving scholarships was given 
and many of the students were so honored. The honor essay- 
ists, comprising three outstanding students of the class, gave 
their speeches. With the help of junior ushers, diplomas were 
then distributed, after which a closing prayer was given. The 
ceremony ~will certainly be a memorable experience in the 
lives of the class of 1947. 



There was no rest for teachers 
whose 1001ns faced the front of the 
building when parts of a trainer 
cuh were hoisted through the win- 
dows of 214A and B to aid the 
students in the study of aviation. 

Those air-raid drills which were 
held almost daily to safe-guard us 
in the event of an actual raid were 
certainly hoped for in the event of 
an examination. . . . 

A Booster Club was formed to 
consist of members of all classes to 
pep up the cheering at the foot- 
ball games and were certainly an 
asset at many of the rallies. They 
could see many of their pals up 
there on the stage, screaming away. 

Chemistry . . . Do you remember 
your first day in the lab . . . those 
huge clouds of smoke that came 
billowing forth from 305? The boys 
wanted to use everything in sight 
while the girls were afraid to touch 
anything. Conversations between 
teachers and pupils went like this: 
"Please, sir, do I have to make 
chlorine gas?" "Does this burn?" 
It's a wonder some of us are still 
alive! . . . 

Bottles on the desks! What is 
this? Many of the seniors had to 
bring grasshoppers to school for the 
study of biology. If one should 
accidently happen to get loose, the 
screams of the girls could be heard 
from one end of the building to 
the other. . . . 

A thousand-word history essay on 
the Constitution. Many a senior 
sat down with books before him to 
(Continued on Page 4) 



WEATHER 

Clear and bright, with no sudden 
change expected in the near 
future. 



EXTRA! 

MISSING 
PROPHECY 
FOUND! 



Police and detectives 
finally located the missing 
class prophecy of the grad- 
uating class at Weymouth 
High. It was found in the 
hide-out of Jack the Zipper, 
cached under a loose board. 
Jack couldn't be reached 
by the reporters for ques- 
tioning, but it was believed 
that he stole it from the 
class of 1947. The text read 
as follows: 

(Continued on Page 6) 



News Highlights 

Service Claims Students 

No less than twelve promising 
graduates left our wonderful high 
school in 1946 for service in the 
United States Army or Navy in 
order to be eligible for benefits 
under the G. I. Bill of Rights. 
Among the prospective graduates 
were Arnold Cook, Raymond 
DAmbrosia, Frank DeLorenzo, 
Paul Leary, Robert Horsch, Vito 
Pardo, Russell Steele, and Albert 
Sheehan, all from South Weymouth. 
Hailing from East Weymouth were 
(Continued on Page 4) 

INDEX 

Editorial Page 2 

Man About Town 1 

New Highlights 1 

Prophecy 5 

Society 9 

Sports 6 

Staff 2 

Weather 1 



c^V» Page Seventeen 



2 



THE WEYMOUTH RECORDER 



SOCIETY NOTES 



The 

WEYMOUTH 
RECORDER 

WEYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 



Owned and operated by Elmer S. 
Mapes, Wallace L. Whittle, and 
Company. Published yearly by the 
Weymouth Trade School. 



Editor-in-chief Paul C. Cleaves 

Asst. Editor Burton Doble 

Sbor's James McCarthy 

George O'Neill 
Charles Hastie 

Man About Town Philip Shepherd 

Carl Peterson 
Burton Doble 
Catherine Smith 

News Highlights Anthony Daniele 

Carl Bnggs 
Shirley Joyce 
Natalie Brown 
Lillian Stone 
Dorothy Hartford 

Society Jean Chase 

Dorothy Danielson 
Fay Maddy 
Patricia Weeks 

Lctters-to-thc-Editor Wallace Newcomb 
James Alison 



Editorial 

As the students of the Class 
of 1947 in years to come look 
back over the four years they 
spent at Weymouth High 
School, they will probably 
consider them their four best 
years of school life. Boys and 
girls will have become great 
athletes, business-men, secre- 
taries, housewives, and so 
forth. For all this they can 
thank their coaches and 
teachers, because under their 
guidance they were taught 
not only to be good students 
and athletes, but also to be 
good leaders and alert citi- 
zens. We know that, even 
though as students they did 
not always show it, they were 
thankful for the training they 
received at good old Wey- 
mouth High School. 



Class of '47 Makes Debut 

Having bowed out of the ranks ol 
undergraduates this morning in an 
impressive graduation ceremon) . 
the Class of 1947 will hold its (lass 
banquet and graduation reception 
in the high school building. As 
these former students prepare for 
the bright future which lies 
before them, they will recall the 
many social activities which were 
enjoyed at Weymouth High School. 

Class of '47 Enrolled 

at High School 

On September 2, 1943, the Class 
of '47 entered its freshman year at 
Weymouth High School, well pre- 
pared for its ensuing four years of 
education. A new era, filled with 
new friends, new activities, and 
new opportunities faced the 
students as they gathered from 
North, South, East Weymouth, and 
Weymouth Landing. During the 
freshman year a news-letter, "Wey- 
mouth Highlights," was compiled 
and sent periodically to classmates 
who had entered the armed forces. 
The Student Council sponsored an 
Athletic Dance in honor of the 
football team on December 3— to 
furnish '47 its first social activity. 
Another social event, viewed by 
most of the class, was the senior 
play, "A Woman of Fifteen," which 
was a huge success. 

1944-1945 
After a brief summer vacation, 
the students returned to the 1944— 
1945 school year in a hub-bub of 
talk concerning vacation. Gradually 
they became accustomed to the 
rules and regulations of the school 
and what was expected of them. 
They saw themselves reflected in 
ihe newly arrived "spectators," 
their freshman counterparts, and 
many a smile was seen, or remark 
passed, on what they, themselves, 
had so recently done. On December 
7, an able committee made up of 
student council members sponsored 
the Athletic Dance in honor of the 
football team. The Senior Play, 
"Youth Takes Over," was witnessed 
by many and considered a great 
success. February 25 found Wey- 
mouth High's auditorium filled to 
capacity for the "Star Spangled Re- 



view," under the direction of Mr. 
John Lyons, with members of the 
band, orchestra, choir, and glee 
club participating. It was a colorful 
musical spectacle enjoyed by all. 

•945-1946 
Junior year (1945-46) found '47 
fully accustomed now to Weymouth 
High, more socially minded than 
ever. The Athletic Dance on De- 
cember 7 was a success and was 
followed shortly by an equally 
successful athletic banquet. The 
class was mighty proud of the 
"swell" job Priscilla Schlusemeyer 
and Barbara Dwyer, '47, were doing 
as cheer leaders. The Christmas 
assembly found members of all 
classes presenting the play, "Why 
the Chimes Rang." January 10 
found the auditorium filled for the 
Winter Concert, under the di- 
rection of Mr. Russell Jack, with 
members of the band, orchestra, 
and choir taking part. Again on 
May 24 the Spring Concert was 
presented and was equally success- 
continued on Page 14) 



Letters to the Editor 



Dear Editors, 

We, a group of prospective grad- 
uates of the Weymouth Trade 
School, have taken this opportunity 
to write to you about changes 
during our years here. 

One of the saddest occurences 
was the passing of Mr. Bryan on 
October 16, 1946. His loss was a 
serious blow both to the Trade 
School and our class. 

Several veterans returned to our 
class to graduate in '47. They were 
Faulds, Pierce, Wood, Bishop, 
Stevenson, and Miller. 

We were favored with two new 
teachers, Mr. Piepei, Carpentry, 
and Mr. Hoyle, Auto Repair. A new 
course in carpentry was also in- 
stalled. 

Lastly, one of our many accom- 
plishments was an interesting ex- 
hibition on May 10, 1946. 

In closing, we wish you all the 
best of luck in your fine publication. 
Sincerely yours, 
Class of '47 
Weymouth Trade School 



Page Eighteen 



THE WEYMOUTH RECORDER 



3 



SPORTS 



WEYMOUTH COPS THIRD 

STATE CROWN 

Again for the third straight year, Weymouth High's track 
team, paced by its great captain, Dick Liva, walked off with 
lop laurels at the State Meet in Boston. Liva won the dash and 
second. Along with Dick as stars were Bill Mills, whom Liva 
broad jump, and ran anchor in the relay team, which came in 
had to beat in the broad jump, Phil Shepherd placing third in 
the dash, and Bob Parsons in the hurdles. We must not, 
however, forget Mr. Page, who ably coached his team on to its 
glorious victory. 



1943 > 1944 



Coach Arlanson Enters Navy 

After a successful year which 
ended with t he winning of the 
Stale Class B Championship, Harry 
Arlanson, Weymouth's great coach, 
left W. H. S. to become a member 
<>l a much bigger team, that of the 
U. S. Navy. 

Weymouth Takes Second 

Place In State Track Meet 

Under the very able coaching of 
Oral Page, tiie Weymouth track- 
sters took a second place in the 
.Stale Meet at Boston Gardens. 

Basketball Notes 

The basketball team, under the 
supervision of Coach Jack Gannon, 
had a good year considering the 
inexperience of the team. 

Baseball 

Faced with the ever-present 
problem of having inexperienced 
players, Coach Delahunt shaped up 
a good baseball team, which won 
most of its games. 



1944 - 1945 



Weymouth Captures State 

Track Crown 

After a year of long, hard 
practice. Coacli Oral Page steered 
his boys to a decisive win in Class 
B of the Stale Meet. This event was 
run on (he massive board track at 
Boston Gardens. 



Weymouth Wins 

Weymouth High again showed 
its power in the sports field by 
heating a previously undefeated 
Milton baseball team. This was the 
team led by Ev Goodwin which 
was to go to the Eastern Massa- 
chusetts Schoolboy playoffs in 
Ten way Park, Boston. 

Basketball Notes 

The basketball team had a not 
too successful season, which 
boasted only three victories in 
thirteen starts. Nevertheless, the 
crowds that attended the games 
were satisfied. 

Paul Sweeney Takes Over 

Coach Paul Sweeney joined the 
staff of Weymouth High to fill the 
shoes of Harry Arlanson. Under 
his direction the boys did fairly 
well, with every game having its 
exciting moments. 



1945 - 1946 



Weymouth Wins Again 

A formidable challenge was met 
and conquered by Weymouth's 
track team. For the second straight 
year, Weymouth won the State 
Class B Track Meet before a 
capacity crowd. 

Football 

The football team had a few 
bad breaks this year under Paul 
Sweeney. After the "Turkey game," 
Weymouth was to have Coach Ar- 
lanson back. 



Coach Arlanson Returns 

After a term in the U. S. Navy, 
Coach Arlanson returned to bolster 
the causes of the baseball and foot- 
ball teams. 

Rockland Goes Down To 
Defeat 

After a just-average year, Wey- 
mouth High's basketball team 
pinned upon our neighbor Rock- 
land its only detent of the year. 
Rockland after its startling defeat 
went on to win the Class B 
Championship at the Boston Gar- 
dens. 



1946 - 1947 



Weymouth Defeats 
Brockton 

Coach Arlanson put the football 
team on top again this year. The 
team won eight games and lost the 
other three by only a one touch- 
down deficit. Highlight of the year 
was the defeat of Brockton by the 
Weymouth warriors. Brockton 
until this defeat was among the top 
contenders for Class A honors. 
Highlight, in reverse, Hingham— , 
Weymouth—! 

Track 

The track team was rather green 
in '47, although there were a few 
veterans. Sadly enough, they 
dropped their first dual home meet 
in seven years on the board track. 
However, their victory in the State 
Meet— their third in as many years 
—was all that was needed for a 
successful year. 

Bill Erwin Comes To 

Weymouth 

Bill Erwin, basketball coach of 
Braintree High, transferred to his 
home-town, Weymouth. Erwin is 
rated one of the best coaches 
on the South Shore, producing 
seven Tech Tourney teams in his 
ten years at Braintree. Although 
the basketball team had the fight 
and ability, luck was not with 
them, as they lost three games by a 
□ne-basket decision. 



c5Sl, Page Nineteen 



4 



THE WEYMOUTH RECORDER 



NEWS HIGHLIGHTS 

(Continued from Page 1) 
Douglas Perrow, Warren Pallis, 
James Heffernan, Thomas Tedes- 
co, and Harlan Stone. The best 
wishes of their classmates went with 
them. 

Teachers Come and Go 

Teachers have been coming and 
going at Weymouth High during 
the last four years for various 
reasons. There is, however, no 
secret why Miss Chase, Miss Free- 
man, Miss Jones, and Miss Pray 
saw fit to leave the pleasant sur- 
roundings of Weymouth High. Mr. 
Bates also left at the end of our 
freshman year to teach in a private 
school in Connecticut. Mr. Bates 
in now teaching in North Carolina. 
Mrs. Oppler, who will be re- 
membered by some of her students 
for her excellence in teaching, 
gave up her work to join her hus- 
band, now a busy man in Japan. 
Mr. Matthews, a math and science 
teacher, left also. After Mr. Calder- 
wood's retirement, Mr. Jack, who 
came from Auburn, Maine, be- 
came supervisor of music. Mrs. 
Bates, our fine janitress, retired 
recently. A sad note was struck 
during our years at Weymouth 
High when Miss MacDavitt, the 
nurse, whom we remembered from 
grammar school days, died. 

Shocking Item 

On April 12, 1945, our beloved 
President, Franklin Delano Roose- 
velt, died from a cerebral hemor- 
rhage. His death was a mournful 
occasion as everyone recalled the 
line qualities and great accom- 
plishments of an excellent man. 

Guidance Teacher 

In England 

A leave of absence for one year 
was granted to Miss Nye, guidance 
teacher, who left to teach in Eng- 
land in exchange for Miss Joan 
Hartley who is now leaching in 
Weymouth. 

"Old" Teachers Return! 

Mr. Cleaves, Mr. Kellv. Mr. Loud, 
Mr. Klay, Mr. Pollard, Mr. Mitchell, 
and Mr. Gutterson, hav ing served in 
the Armed Forces, came back to pro- 

cl from where they left off. All in 
all, llic- siall has < hanged mu< h din - 
ing oui years at Weymouth High. 



New Superintendent, 
Faculty Members, Join '47 

Outstanding newcomer to Wey- 
mouth High was our superintend- 
ent, Mr. Elmer S. Mapes, who 
replaced Mr. Thibadeau in 1945. 
Miss Gloster joined the staff as 
librarian. Mr. Scott, chemistry and 
mathematics teacher, and Mr. 
Erwin, history teacher and basket- 
ball coach, also entered the ranks 
of teachers in Weymouth High. 
Completing the list of teachers new 
to Weymouth High were: Miss 
MacDougall, Mrs. Darling, Miss 
Palmer, Miss Salo, Miss Pope, Mrs. 
Wood, Miss Ghiorse, Mrs. Moats, 
Miss Flaherty, and Miss Corey, 
secretary. 

New Courses 

Prove Successful 

A Food, Clothing, and Nutrition 
Course was offered to freshman 
business students and was an added 
advantage to all who took it. An- 
other course that was not only 
interesting but extremely helpful 
was given as a Guidance Course 
to the incoming freshmen. It 
helped them to become acquainted 
with methods of studying. The 
effects of this course became evident 
in the fact that it enabled more 
students to make the honor roll in 
their later years. Design for Living, 
a senior course under the manage- 
ment of the Art Department, was 
instituted in 1946. 

O Happy Days! 

Happy were the days of May 8, 
1945. and August 17, 1945. On these 
historical dates ended the two main 
phases of the worst war the world 
has ever seen. On May 8, Victory in 
Europe Day. the students of Wey- 
mouth High School heard a stirring 
speech by our new President, Harry 
S. Truman. August 17, 1945 marked 
the end of the war with Japan. 
World War II was truly an unfor- 
gettable experience for Weymouth 
students. 
Clubs, New and Old, Hit Stride 

Back To School Days 

The old phrase, "back to school," 
assumed added meaning when 
several ex-servicemen returned to 
books, bells, and blackboards, either 
to increase their education or to 
supplement it. The appearance of 
these returning soldiers offered 
sterling advice to students who 
were contemplating leaving school. 



"Grand Old Seniors"!! 

The senior year, most outstand- 
ing and longest remembered, 
started socially on December 5 with 
the Athletic Banquet, which feted 
the football players. December 13 
found the class enjoying the Ath- 
letic Dance. A short play, Dickens's 
"Christinas Carol," was perfoimcd 
by members of the classes at the 
Christmas assembly. Mr. Jack pre- 
sented the Winter Concert on the 
evening of January 17. The Senior 
Play, "A Date with Judy," offered 
on February 14, was a tremendous 
success. A second performance was 
required February 19 to meet the 
clamor for tickets. A Senior Prom, 
arranged by an "on the job" com- 
mittee, was enjoyed on the evening 
of May 16. The evening of June 19 
found members of the graduating 
class enjoying the Senior Reception 
with their friends. The outing, 
organized by a talented committee, 
was a highly thrilling affair hailed 
by all as they realized it was the 
ending of four pleasant years at 
Weymouh High School. 



MAN ABOUT TOWN 

(Continued from Page 1) 

learn more about the past. This 
time it seemed almost impossible 
to do, but the "poor" seniors fin- 
ally managed to pass them in. . . . 

"Sweet" Swing Takes Over 

Early in the year the class of '47 
was blessed with a small group of 
talented "li'l" musicians. These 
"Petrillo worshippers" worked their 
way into one of the rallies and from 
then on each rally was set to the 
pace of sweet music. 

The small "combo" was organ- 
ized the first of the year by Dave 
(Benny Goodman) Resnick. Know- 
ing a good musician. Dave picked 
Phil ("The Hawk") Shepherd to 
play tenor sax. The two, realizing 
that they needed good rhythm, 
called on Joe (Kruppa) Nevins to 
do them the honor and "Biffer" 
McCue to tickle the ivories. The 
quartet got together and, taking a 
"shot in the dark," chose Bill Smith, 
who turned out to be a fine asset 
to the "Hot Tamales." . . . 

Phil arranged the music, con- 
tributed by "Biffer", to please the 
students of Weymouth High. 



Page Twenty *\i^> 




CLASS PROPHECY 




INSIDE OF 
SPORTS 

By "MO" 



SAM CHRISTIE is the famous 
masked wrestler, known and feared 
by all his opponents as the "Killer." 
JACOB NESSON has finally 
achieved his ambition in life. 
"Jack" is now the star sports report- 
er for the Boston Traveler. 
WILLIAM BRADY is busy, 'tis 
said, pitching the Boston Red 
to their first pennant in ten years. 
That new sports commentator who 
can be heard nightly on Station 
WBZ is none other than our own 
FRED LOUD. Fred also is playing 
third base with the Red Sox. CARL 
BERGFORS is one of the leading 
contenders in the annual B.A.A. 
He gives great credit to the ex- 
perience acquired at Weymouth 
High School. JOHN GALLIAN is 
now the physical director at the 
newly erected Y. M. C. A. "Bud's" 
body-building class is open to all 
comers. The new hockey player 
with the Boston Bruins is JAMES 
DALY. It seems that "Bud" played 
so much hockey when he was young 
that the Bruins signed him as a 
first string forward. Good Luck, 
"Bud". ROBERT McLELLAN is 
now Ski Instructor at Sun Valley. 
On the side, Bob is said to be 
giving skating istructions to some of 
the Hollywood Starlets who are 
vacationing there. The New York 
Yankees have certainly come up in 
the world the last year or so. Could 
it be that handsome new pitcher 
they so recently acquired? KEN- 
NETH MUNROE always did make 
a big hit at Weymouth so that 
perhaps he is now helping the 
Yankees to make one in New York. 
The Braves now have a catcher 
who is giving Fred Loud stiff com- 
petition for baseball honors, That's 
right; it s WILLIAM MacINTOSH! 

WEYMOUTH PERSONALS 

RICHARD BATES, owner of 
"Dick's Pool Room," has left on his 
annual trip to Miami, Florida. 
While there, he plans to take part 
in his favorite spoil, loafing in the 
sun until the winter has gone. 

ROY BURR recently invested in 
a line of chicken farms on the South 
Shore. 



WONDER TEAMS TIE AT 

MADISON SQUARE GARDEN 



Massachusetts 
Independents 
Unbeatable 

Boston— USP—1 he Massachusetts 
Independents, who have replaced 
the Chicago Bears as the perennial 
winners in the National Football 
League, have done it again. 1 he 
Independents rolled over the West- 
ern League Winners, the Los 
Angeles Dons, 79 10 3. causing talk 
that they should be broken up as 
the Philadelphia Athletics were in 
baseball. 

The outset of the game gave no 
indication of the final score, as the 
Independents' speed merchants, 
RICHARD LIVA. BURTON 
DOBLE, and WARREN PORTER, 
were bottled up and it remained for 
REX FENDERSON, ROBERT 
WARREN, and big MICHAEL 
LaROCCO 10 halt the attack of the 
vaunted Dons. Then the "brain", 
WILLIAM LEONE, began to wave 
his magic wand over his bag of 
plays and, before the half ended, 
the score was 34 to o. 

( Continued on Page 8) 



New York (AP) —The two top 
teams in the professional ranks of 
the country, the Davets of Wey- 
mouth and the Boston Celtics, 
played to a capacity crowd iti the 
Gardens last night, with the hectic 
sea-saw affair ending in an 89 to 
89 tie. The Davets were a smooth 
team with fanatic accuracy in their 
passing, a compliment to their 
coach GEORGE BAILEY. Baile) 
reallv has a good group of wizard 
ball handlers from Weymouth. 
Coach ROBER I CO I E, not to be 
outdone, brought an equally good 
team here tonight which employed 
the famous Rhode Island State type 
of play. 

Davets Co Ahead 
The Davets jumped away to an 
earl) lead of 22 to 18 in the first 
quarter, featuring two spectacular 
one hand push shots from half floor 
l>\ DONALD "DUCKY" SWAN 
and the set shooting of JOHN 
DOYLE. 

For the Celtics, only the stellar 
backboard performance of HENRY 
BOUCHER kept the score of the 
Davets down. 

Celtics Rebound 
The second period found big 
DONALD HANNAFORD and 
( Continued on Page 8) 



Sports Comments 



By "GOB' 



MELVIN CO WE, better known to 
friends as "Mel," is now the young- 
est anil most popular sports writer 
in Massachusetts. He is at present 
working with the Boston Globe. 
One of the best sports photo- 
grapher in 1 he newspaper business 
is LAWRENCE CAULIIELD. 
"Minnow" tan lie seen at all majoi 
sports events taking photographs 
for the Quincy Patroit Ledger 
where he is at present employed. 
After holding the wrestling cham- 
pionship of New England lor many 
years, RICHARD SHERWOOD 
was given the position of Commis- 
sioner of Wrestling. CLAYTON 
STONE has now readied the pin- 
nacle ol success. He is now making 
large sums of money all over the 
country, walking oil with cup alter 
cup at all track events. SHERMAN 



RUSH TON won the wrestling 
match which was held in France 
last week. Now "Sherm" is the 
world's champion w restler. The new 
physical director of Clap]) Me- 
morial is JOHN SHEEHY. We arc- 
all sure that his pupils will all be 
future Weymouth High champions. 
SALVATORE PEPE now stars for 
the "Philadelphia Phillies." "Sam- 
my" can be seen in the outfield 
doing his best whenever the Phillies 
play. FRANK ROBERTSON is 
now an expert game hunter. "Rob- 
bie" can shoot anything right 
between the eyes looking in a 
mirror and shooting behind him 
with a ten guage shotgun. JAMES 
ALLISON is the new chairman of 
the Fish Committee for the Wey- 
mouth Sportsmen's Club. Best of 
luck, "Jimmy." 



Page Twenty -two c \&-' 



THE WEYMOUTH RECORDER 



7 



SCIENTIFIC 
NOTES 

New York, July 5: (AP) —A huge 
convention was held here today in 
the Waldorf-Astoria. The conven- 
tion was a gathering together of all 
the I)is4 wigs in the scientific field — 
doctors, muses, engineers, chemists 
and man) others. Their homes were 
scattered all over the nation, hut a 
large group of them came from 
Wcv mouth, and, ama/inglv . were all 
in the graduating (lass of 1917 at 
W.H.S. Some ol them were: 

MARILYN ALLEY - Marilyn 
aided l>\ her wonderful disposition 
is superintendent of nurses in one 
ol Boston's largest hospitals. 

LEO BOYLE— Leo's desires have 
been realized at last since he has 
been made head surgeon in a large 
boston hospital. 

KARL BRIGGS— After gradu- 
ating 1 1 0111 l ull's. Karl became a 
dentist and on the side he raises 
a hiood of black-haired children. 

ELSIE CAIN— Elsie's ambition 
was at last realized when she was 
appointed 10 the staff of the Wey- 
mouth Hospital as a doctor. Nice 
doc lor! 

JUDY CICCONE-The men in 
Wcv mouth have all developed 
sudden ailments since they dis- 
covered Judv is a nurse at the South 
Shore Hospital. 

ERNEST DURANTE-Ernie is 
now chief engineer in his father's 
business. 

RAYMOND EVANS— Ray is now 
back al Weymouth High and has 
taken over the enviable position as 
head ol the Physics department. 

PEARL FISHER— If aches and 
pains seem to persist, just ask for 
the assistance of Nurse Pearl Fisher. 

MARY JANE FRASER-We have 
a \isi1im4 nurse in our midst and 
I'm sure everyone will feel better if 
he just asks for the aid of Mary 
|ane. 

[UNE JERPI— June is now a 
practical nurse. Her smile quickl) 
brings her patients back to health 
again. 

' BEVERLY JORDAN — "Bev", now 
a dental hygienist, has recently per- 
fected a tooth paste which need be 
applied but once a week and 
prevent all decay. 

SHIRLEY JOYGE— Shirley, fol- 
lowing in the footsteps of her sister, 
finds thai the best cure for anyone 
( Continued on Page 8) 



News from 
the Capitol 

Many attended the memorable 
ceremony which took place on the 
lawn of the White House, a short 
lime ago. 

Il look place in order to promote 
men in all branches ol the Armed 
Forces. Among those receiving the 
promotions were four former Wey- 
"mouth High Students. 

First, the Army marched by the 
reviewing stand where the president 
stood. Among the awards in this 
branch. SGT. ROBERT CAVAN- 
AUGH was promoted to Staff 
Seargeant and no man could be 
more capable of this position. 

The Navy followed, their unfonns 
showing a deep blue against the 
warm sun. 

- First man to come forward was 
ROBERT SCHULER, who was 
promoted to Boatswain's Mate, and 

■he still dreams of being captain ol 
his own ship. Another Navy man, 
ENSIGN WILLIAM THURSTON, 
was promoted to lieutenant. He is 
waiting for his pension which he 
will obtain in about ten years. 

Next came THOMAS PITCHER, 
who just graduated from Annapolis. 
He was made a first lieutenant. 

The Coast Guard also took part 
in this glorious ceremony, when 
CAPTAIN PETER JOHNSON 
was made an admiral. We hear 
that he contributes many of his 
newlv won South American beauties 
to strike-ridden Hollywood. 

The Marine Corps followed, but 
sad 10 say, none of our Weymouth 
High men received any honors. 



ENTERTAINMENT 
ITEMS 



Drummer Signs Contract 

EDMUND WRIGHT has left 
his position as Music Instructor at 
Weymouth High to become a drum- 
mer in the entertainment world. 
"Ed" recently signed a contract 
with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and can 
be seen in his forthcoming picture. 
"The Drummer and The Lady." 

Understudy Takes Over 

When Al Jolson became ill, just 
before his performance last even- 
ing. ROBERT KING, his under 
study, took over. "Bob" was so 
good, when he sang "Mammie," 



Aft Department 



Last night the fifth annual 
banquet was given in New York 
City for the leading artists, illus- 
trators, cartoonists, decorators, etc. 
of the United States. 

Some of those present had down 
in from the west coast. Among 
them was DON ALMQUIST, 
assistant to Walt Disney in his 
Hollywood studio. 

MISS JEAN GOURLEY, famous 
cartoonist for the New Yorker, 
entertained with an amusing illus- 
trated talk. 

Among those enjoying the ban- 
quet were THOMAS AMOS, the 
commercial artist whose work 
appears in all the leading magazines, 
and MISS BERTHA La MON- 
TAGNE, fashion illustrator for one 
of the well-known New York stores 
and recently voted one of the best- 
dressed women in New York City. 

Presentation of awards concluded 
:he banquet with DAVID RES- 
NICK'S receiving the award for 
.the outstanding interior decorator 
of the year. 



critics have acclaimed him a second 
Jolson and he has been offered a 
score of contracts. 

"Date With Judy" 

is Broadway Hit 

At the opening of the sensational 
Broadway Hit, "A Date With Judy," 
were a great many celebreties, 
among whom were, WILLIAM 
LEVANGIE, now publisher of the 
New York Times. With Bill was 
ALBERT LANDERS, the gentle- 
man from New England who owns 
most of the theatres in that district. 
Also present was ROY BRIGHAM 
the famed geologist who was 
accompanied by his wife. WILLIAM 
LUSCOMB came with his wife and 
another couple. When "Slim" was 
asked what he was doing these days, 
he answered with his well-known 
smile, "I'm happily married now 
and most contented." Of course, the 
star in this show was little AUDREY 
McKENNA who did a grand job 
and proved that she is really an 
actress worthy of praise. 

WEYMOUTH PERSONALS 

HENRY POULIN recently 
opened a new taxi stand in South 
Weymouth and he already has a 
flourishing business. 



c^SV, Page Twenty-three 



8 



THE WEYMOUTH RECORDER 



WONDER TEAMS 

TIE AT GARDEN 

(Continued from Page 6) 
"Hank" Boucher finding the range, 
both out at mid-floor and under 
the basket. Former ail-American 
JOHN MURPHY led beautifully 
to set up these giants. RICHARD 
CARUSO was a stalwart on the 
defense and prevented the Celtics 
from scoring on many break away 
shots. The half ended, Celtics 49, 
Davets 41. 

As the third quarter began, it 
was evident that Bailey and Cote 
had inspired their teams with a 
pep talk. This period was a fast 
hectic one ending 58 to 58. There 
was little scoring while there 
seemed to be a private duel be- 
tween Caruso and Murphy, with 
each dominating the floor game 
of their team. 

Bitter Struggle 

It was plain that both teams 
were out to win in the final quarter. 
Swan's fantastic off-balance shots 
didn't miss, Doyle's set shots sang 
a tune as they swished through the 
nets; and Caruso, besides person- 
ally slowing the Celtics' attack, 
scored ten quick points with his 
deadly right hand. Big Boucher 
and Hannaford really moved for 
big men and, if one missed a shot, 
the other put in the rebound. 
Murphy's floor game and set shots 
which suddenly connected also 
threw a monkey wrench into the 
Davets' passing game. As the game 
ended, a long shot by Murphy 
arched in the air and fell in, tying 
the game 8g to 89. By a previous 
agreement, the game was to end at 
n;oo, so there was no overtime 
period. 

This game was the largest 
gathering of former Ail-Americans 
ever to play in one game. 



DAVETS 
Flayer G. F. P. 
Boucher rf.i 1 2 24 
Lazarri 5 1 1 1 
Renken If 1 1 3 
Hannaford 9 s 23 
Muff 000 
Murphy rg.i 1 
Jones o o 

Doe lg 02 

37 IS 



26 



CELTICS 
Player G. F. P. 
Swan RF. 12 3 27 
Hoefer 02 2 
Gray LF. 102 
Simmons 00 
Caruso C. 6 8 26 
Smith 00 o 
Doyle RG. 
Sullivan 



8 26 



33 23 i 



Referees — GEORGE WOOD and 
ROBERT RODGERSON 

Entertainment During the Half 
During the half, the huge gather- 
ing immensely enjoyed the spec- 
tacular roller skating of BARBARA 
TAYLOR, also of Weymouth. This 
slim beauty, who holds more 

Page Twenty'four c \&-' 



skating records than any other 
woman, really put on a show for 
the fans here last night. "Barb" 
easily proved to them why she is 
the champ she is. 



MASS. INDEPENDENTS 

(Continued from Page 6) 
Doble started it olf by streaking 
through the middle for 37 yards 
and a T. D. After that GERALD 
SULLIVAN was on the receiving 
end of a long Doble pass and later- 
aled to JAMES DUCA who scored 
Every time the Massachusetts team 
got hold of the ball, they scored 
Liva and Porter both tallied on end 
runs with hair-raising blocks being 
thrown for them by CHARLES 
FAULD and player-coach, ROBERT 
CLARK. As the half ended, the 
Mass. team had begun to show 
why they were considered the 
nation's best. 

The player-coach, ROBERT 
CLARK, was a student of the T 
formation and his team exhibited 
a flawless demonstration of it with 
beautiful blocking and line play. 

The second half was merely a 
runaway with the speed king trio 
of Doble, Liva, and Porter running 
tirelessly up and down the field. 
The hopelessly outclassed Dons, 
when they did receive the ball, 
were literally thrown back as 
proved by the yards lost— 93. Fauld, 
Warren, Clark, Fenderson, and 
LaRocco were diminutive rocks of 
Gibralter, while "Jim" Duca and 
Sullivan's great catches from Doble 
helped the backs run up the score. 
The power of the Massachusetts 
Independents cannot be over-esti- 
mated as can be seen by the 
statistics. 

INDEPENDENTS 
LE Duca LG Clark 

LT LaRocco RG Fenderson 

C Fauld RE Sullivan 

RT Warren RHB Doble 

QB Leone FB Liva 

LHB Porter 

DONS 

LE Goodreault LG Reinhard 
LT Bouley RG Lio 

C Hein RE Hutson 

RT Hein RHB Harmon 

RT Coulter FB Kinbrough 

QB Luckman 
LHB Ducley 

STATISTICS 

I. D. 

First downs 21 2 

Yards gained 581 17 

Yards lost 2 93 

Passes attempted 7 27 

Passes completed 5 2 

Passes intercepted 3 1 

Punts 1 8 

Distance of Punts 47 38 

Runback of Punts 130 o 

Fumbles 1 5 

Own fumbles recovered 1 2 



SCIENTIFIC NOTES 

(Continued from Page 7) 
is a good nurse. She is the popular 
head nurse at Weymouth Hospital. 

ROBERT LEGGETT _ "Bob" 
holds the enviable position of being 
Weymouth's school doctor. He- 
achieved this goal after years of 
hard work. 

BERNARD (.. MATTIE— "Bar- 
ney" has invented his own carbu- 
reter. One pint of this high-test 
gas will carry him fifty-three and 
one hall miles. 

JAMES McCARTHY— "Mac" is 
now one of the well-known 
doctors of our town. 

GEORGE McCUE-"Biff's" bed- 
side manner is very different from 
other doctors. He soothes his 
patients by playing the piano. 

JOANNE McMERRIMAN - 
Joanne is one of the most successful 
psychiatrists in Boston. Her sooth- 
ing voice has been one of the main 
assets in the success of her career. 

HERBERT MOORE-' Herb" has 
won recognition as a veterinarian 
because of his having treated that 
great racehorse "Toothpick." 

JEAN NASH— Jean, the famous 
chemist from Harvard, has just 
arrived at a new theory in the field 
of atomic energy. 

GEORGE ONEIL-"Bud" has 
completed his engineering course 
at M. I. T. and is soon leaving for 
Alaska to work on plans for a huge 
suspension bridge to Japan. 

DAVID PANLSON— "Dave," after 
graduating from M. I. T., has 
become the leading chemist of the 
day and works for the DuPont Co. 

BARBARA PERRY - Quincy 
Hospital feels very proud to have 
Barbara on its staff. She is one of 
the best nurses on the South Shore. 

CARL PETERSON-Carl is burn- 
ing the midnight oil over his new 
invention for odorless chlorine gas. 

DORIS THERIAULT— Doris is 
now a registered nurse, well on her 
way to superintendent of Wey- 
mouth Hospital, though she still 
finds time for roller skating. 

NANCY CAIN-Nancy, having 
acquired her Ph.D., is now travel- 
ling throughout the United States, 
lecturing at the many colleges. 



WEYMOUTH PERSONALS 

The town of Weymouth ap- 
pointed MICHAEL SMITH to take 
Mr. Martin's position as head 
history teacher at Weymouth High 
School. 



I 



SOCIETY PAGE 



Many Former Weymouth Students 

At Hollywood Party 



ersonals 



The former SHIRLEY REIDY 
and her husband have recently re- 
turned from their honeymoon at 
Niagra Falls, Canada. The couple 
were married two weeks ago and 
plan to make their home in East 
Weymouth. WINIFRED WALL- 
IXC, has just returned from a vaca- 
tion in Bermuda to work at the 
Commercial Bank w here she is em- 
ployed as a secretary. 

EDWARD ADAMS, better known 
to his friends as "Ears," has re- I 
cently returned to New York after} 
a brief visit at his home in North 
Weymouth. "Ears" is employed as 
chief accountant in one of the 
larger New York Corporations, 
where he mixes up figures— hmmm. 

RALPH ANDREA, owner of a 
chain of successful chicken farms, 
has left on a trip to Quebec where 
he plans to study agricultural con- 
ditions. 

JEAN BENTLEY and her hus- 
band have arrived home from their 
honeymoon. They have been 
traveling extensively throughout 
Europe. Their residence will be in 
Boston. 

It was overheard by a reporter 
that GLADYS CARTER will be 
running for Town Clerk in the 
coming election. At present Miss 
Carter is employed as an accountant 
in that office, where she is popular 
and well-liked by all. 





MARJORIE ARMSTRONG to 
an ex-Marine. They plan to live in 
China. BARBARA MESSIER, for- 
mer school teachcer, to a Braintree 
resident. Her pupils will miss her. 
DOROTHY DANIELSON, a love- 
ly secretary to her former employer, 
President of Jordan Marsh Com- 
pany. ETHEL EVANSON to an 
ex-Marine. A mid-winter wedding 
is planned. JEAN CULLIVAX, 
that happy-go-lucky redhead, to 
that fellow from Center Street. 
ANNIE McNAMARA, former sec- 
retary, to the present owner of the 
Quincy Market. 



Bridal Shower Given 

A bridal shower was given by the 
members of the Advertising De- 
partment of Sheridan's. The guest 
of honor was the former MISS 
MARGARET KNOX, who has left 
their employment to take over the 
management of her new home on 
Honeymoon Lane. 

Will Entertain Jolly Eight 

ELEANOR WALSH will enter- 
tain the Jolly Eight at her home 
next Monday evening. Refreshments 
will be served and games enjoyed. 

Birthday Party For Twins 

A birthday party was enjoyed at 
Mrs. BAIRD'S for her daughter 
BARBARA'S children, Barbie and 
Bob, who are celebrating their 
second birthday. Refreshments were 
served from a table decorated in 
pink and blue. 

Leaves For Washington 

MELVLN WALSH recently left 
for the state of Washington, where 
he will be employed as head 
engineer of a well-known construc- 
tion company. He will be accom- 
panied by his wife. 

Farewell Party Given For 
Robert W. Clark 

A farewell party was given for 
ROBERT CLARK who has just 
about reached the top. "Bob" is 
leaving for Washington, where he 
will hold a conference with Senator 
Claghorne. 

Author Reveals Secret 

To Success 

MISS HELENA LEVANGIE 
known to many as "Ann," has at 
last revealed how she reached the 
pinnacle of success so quickly as an 
author. The secret to her love 
stories, she says, comes from listen- 
ing to the conversations which take 
place on Great Hill. 



Another in the series of those 
large Hollywood parties was held 
the other evening at the home of 
Samuel Goldwyn of Metro-Gold- 
wyn-Mayer. Among the many 
celebrities were a host of former 
students from Weymouth High 
School, Class of '47. 

First on the program was the 
vivacious radio entertainer LOR- 
RAINE CONDRICK who can be 
heard each morning on the "Rise 
and Shine Program" of which she 
is the star. Her amusing comments 
on "Exercises and What They Do 
for You" were found enjoyable by 
all. 

Following Miss Condrick was 
ANTHONY DANIELE, the famed 
concert pianist, who gave an ex- 
cellent performance which held 
his audience at complete attention. 
It is rumored that before Tony goes 
on his European tour next spring, 
he will return to Weymouth High 
School to give them a few pointers 
on basketball. 

That first class drummer with 
the winning smile, TONY Del BOS- 
CO, was next to make his appear- 
ance. After hearing his playing, it 
is not hard to understand why 
Tony's Saturday night program is 
so popular. 

NORMA FARRELL, the sensa- 
tional new singer with Vaughn 
Monroe, sang several of the popular 
songs, thus proving she has a voice 
as lovely as herself. Here's hoping 
she has a very successful careerl 

JANETTE JONES, the cele- 
brated opera singer who recently 
returned from a tour of Europe, 
sang several selections from the 
opera "Madam Butterfly." Miss 
Jones will open shortly at the 
"Met." 

ARNOLD LASSE, who is hailed 
as the "Frankie" of the year, sang 
several selections and had the 
younger folks swooning. The older 
people, however, wonder if it is 
Lasse's voice or his unusual ties^ 

Between numbers I glanced over 
at one of the cozy corners and there 
saw "GREG" MACRI. "Greg" is 
now competing wih Van Johnson 
for the affections of the bobby- 
soxers of the land, from the reports 
(Continued on Page 10) 



C^SV, Page Twenty-five 



10 



THE WEYMOUTH RECORDER 



Staff 

Edward Adams Editor-in-Chief 

Barbara Baird Advertising Editor 

Mary Bresnahan Service Editor 

Marion Doyle Commercial Editor 

Betty Connolly Assistant 

Lois Gould Assistant 

Bertha LaMontagne Fashion Editor 

Helena LaVangie Entertainment Ed. 

George McCue Literary Editor 

John Sheehy Scientific Editor 

Barbara Messier Assistant 

Jean Nash Art Editor 

Patricia Williams Society Editor 

Karen Thornberg Assistant 

Shirley Reidy Local News Editor 

Melvin Walsh Sports Editor 

Donald Swan .". Assistant 

Robert L. Leach City Editor 

Harold W. Nelson Assistant 

Francis X. Kelly Faculty Adviser 

New York Society 
Fashion Show 

New York socialites received a 
real taste of the fashion-conscious 
world as the season's newest models 
paraded down the runway of the 
Waldorf-Astoria in SHIRLEY SA- 
VOLA'S lavish creations. A great 
deal of attention was focused on tall 
bloinde MARION DOYLE whose 
stately beauty was admired as much 
as the gold brocade she wore. This 
beauty, it is said, is only modelling 
to pass the time while her husband 
is in the service. 

Then all eyes turned as a girl 
with her blonde hair against a 
stylish black dress made a striking 
appearance. This gorgeous blonde 
was the new Power's find, SHIRLEY 
CARLSON. 

A series of "ohs" and "ahs" were 
heard when DORIS GERRY mod- 
elled a coral suit which added 
something special to her brown- 
haired beauty. 

And now, a bit about the 
audience of which you no doubt 
are interested. You would recog- 
nize BETTY CONNOLLY and 
BARBARA CONDRICK, two 
black-haired beauties whose lovely 
faces have often appeared on the 
leading magazines. Rumors have it 
that these beauties are giving up 
their careers in favor of matrimony. 
Another cover girl present was 
charming little JUANITA STUBBS, 
Then, too, our favorite movie 
comedian, RED CARTER, arrived, 
making this gala fashion show 
something to attend. 



Dietitian Honored 
At Banquet 

MISS SHIRLEY DEAN was hon- 
ored by the teachers and pupils of 
Weymouth High School last nighl 
at a banquet in her honor for her 
faithful senile as dietitian of the 
high school cafeteria. 

North Weymouth 

Midgets Win 

Again the North Weymouth Mid- 
gets triumphed. This time, over 
the South Weymouth Midgets. 
Stars of each learn were "Slim, Jr." 
and "Bill, Jr." Among the parents 
watching the game were the former 
HELEN CASCIANI and SHIRLEY 
BRENAN. 

Anniversary Party 

Celebrated By 

Weymouth Couple 

Yesterday, Mr. and Mrs. Bianco 
gave an anniversary party in honor 
of their daughter, the former 
ROSEMARIE BIANCO and their 
versatile young son-in-law. There- 
were many guests present, among 
them former schoolmates of the 
couple. 

Local Boy Makes Good 

ROBERT "BOB" DIZER who 
was such a success as a singer in his 
school days will soon appear in "The 
Dancing Belle." 

Lecturer Will Speak 
At Hunt School 

ARLENE WOOD, state health 
instructor will speak tonight at the 
P. T. A. at the Hunt School. Her 
topic will be the "Importance of 
Calisthenics in Everyday Life." 

Recital Given By Well- 
Known Dancing Teacher 

Many people attended the recital 
given by the former MARY BRES- 
NAHAN, who is teaching ballet 
and ballroom dancing, besides run- 
ning her beautiful home. 

Future President? 

ALFRED SPENCE. present Gov- 
ernor of Massachusetts, is expected 
to be a candidate for the presidencv 
in the (oming election. Having 
stalled his career as class president 
anil working his way up to his 
present position, we all feel that 
"Al" has the personality and the 
ability to be a very capable presi- 
dent. 



HOLLYWOOD PARTY 

(Continued from Page <j) 

he rates pretty high just as he 
always did. 

That noted violinist, WILLIAM 
MILLS, was next on the program, 
.mil his music was superb. It made 
(he other Weymouthites wonder if 
perhaps all the practice he had in 
his sophomore year at Weymouth 
High School did not help on his 
road to fame. 

After the entertainment, dancing 
was enjoyed witli Tommy Dorscy's 
orchestra. The new drummer with 
the orchestra was none other than 
our own JOE NEVINS beating out 
time. 

"BOB" PIERCE, who is head 
bouncer at the Stork Club, was on 
hand. I am glad to report that he 
was there as a guest and not in his 
professional capacity. 

PRISCILLA SCHLUSEMEYI.R. 
better known to her friends as 
"Sluzy," has now taken over Hedy 
La Man 's place in Hollywood. 
When she entered, all eyes turned 
toward the door, which fact helps 
to prove that she is a huge success 
here! 

"CATHY" SMITH, the lead- 
ing lady in her own radio show, 
arrived late, but, as always, every- 
one was glad to see her. 

"BILL" SMITH, band director 
at the "Diamond Horseshoe," was 
there and kept all amused with his 
tales of New York. We were all glad 
to see that Bill had found a way to 
combine his two interests in life- 
Music and Girls. 

PHIL SHEPPARD, who is now 
head of the Musicians' Union in 
place of Petrillo, told this reporter 
that it won't be long now before 
legislation will be passed requiring 
an eighteen piece band to play at 
all weddings. I wonder. 

DICK THAYER was a guest at 
the party and we were all glad to 
see him and hear the good news 
that he is back at Weymouth High- 
not as a student— but as director of 
the new one hundred piece band. 

EDWARD TIERNEY came just 
before the part) broke up. When 
someone asked Ed what he was 
doing now, he replied that he is 
superintendent of the fellows who 
put the bends in the trombones. 

That's all for now except to say 
that the party was a huge success 
aad that everyone had a wonderful 
time. So until next time this is your 
Hollywood reporter Barbara Rux- 
ton, saying goodbye and good luck. 



Page Twenty-six c \&^ 



THE WEYMOUTH RECORDER 



11 



Fifth Wedding Anniversary 

I he former LILLIAN S TONE 
;ind her husband were recently hon- 
ored l>\ their friends and relatives 
on their lilih wedding anniversary. 
I lu \ received many lovely gifts. 

Returns From Japan 

MISS PATRICIA MacLEOD has 
jusi returned to her home in Wey- 
mouth, aftei five years in Tokyo. 
She will give an informal talk al 
the nexl meeting of the Mondav 
Club. All are invited. 

Mystery Solved! 

I he mystery of why all men pas- 
sengers of JOHN DWYER'S new 
High) trip to New York have been 
coming oil the plane in a dazed 
condi ion has been solved. It seems 
that HELEN TOWER and GER- 
AI DIM. WOLFE are the steward- 
essess. 

WEYMOUTH PERSONALS 

That new mailman in the East 
Weymouth district is MADISON 
\\ HI I TIER. He is well-liked by 
.ill to whom he delivers mail. 

RICHARD ANDERSON recently 
left aftei a brief visit at his 
home in North Weymouth. "Dick" 
is employed in New York at one of 
the leading restaurants as chief 
accountant. 

PATRICIA SHERRICK has re- 
turned to California and her Santa 
Anita Race "Track. Pat's famous 
horses are renowned throughout 
the world. 

DONALD C. BISHOP, who was 
left a large inheritance by his 
grandfather, has now retired and 
bough) a couritr) home. "Don" is 
now referred to by his friends as 
" That Country Gentleman." 

NORMAN BLANCHARD, is 
now the chief distributor of the 
Patriot Ledger. He achieved his 
position by starting as a paper boy 
himself. 

MISS NATALIE BROWN of 
Weymouth was voted the most out- 
standing business woman of the 
year 1>\ the businessmen of America 
at a recent meeting. Miss Brown is 
at present employed by a large 
Miami concern, and was pleased to 
have at last reached her goal. 

"PATRICIA WILLIAMS, Senior 
Retail Buyer" is t he impressive title 
now lettered on "Pat's" office door, 
where she competently handles 
her line of business. 

[RENE RYAN recently began 
work as a bookkeeper in the business 
ciHiccs of Jordan Marsh Company. 



WEYMOUTH PERSONALS 

EDWARD SILVA has at long 
last fulfilled his wish. He is now one 
of the country's most promising 
engineers. 

The former BETSEY ABBOTT 
• incl her husband, coach of the 
Braintree track team, celebrated 
their fifth anniversary at the Copley 
Plaza's Oval Room. Many guests 
were present. 

LOiS GOULD has just concluded 
her duties as air line hostess for 
I . W. A., in preparation for her 
approaching marriage. 

MISS PATRICIA WEEKS has 
just accepted the position of dieti- 
tian at the Peter Bent Brigham 
Hospital. She begins her duties 
trext month. 

The former FAY MADDY and her 
scholarly husband are now visiting 
relatives of the bride while on their 
honeymoon in the West and Islands 
of Bermuda. 

The former MARION MAR- 
TELL has just left to join her 
soldier husband at an army camp. 

MISS SHIRLEY SHEPHERD 
will preside at the meeting of the 
State Women's Club to be held 
tomorrow night at her home. Plans 
for an outing will be discussed. 

MISS SALLY MATHEWS has 
just returned home from the United 
Nations Conference. She has been 
employed as an interpreter there 
for two years. 

OILMAN SYLVESTER is the 
president of a large musical in- 
strument manufacturing company 
out on the west coast, which he 
inherited from an old friend of his 
family. 

STEN NELSON is now a success- 
ful poultry farmer. His hobby is 
keeping champion cows and it is 
proving to be a very profitable one. 

MISS MURIEL WOODWORTH 
is back at the Bicknell School, where 
she is a third grade teacher. Muriel 
is very popular with her pupils, and 
there is an apple on her desk every 
morning. 

ROBERT BELCHER is now pro- 
prietor of a trucking company. 
During the week-ends, Bob can be 
seen resting on his poultry farms 
and doing the work he most 
enjoys. 

The Dwyers Contracting Com- 
pany welcomed a new manager 
Monday night at a dinner party 
held at Coral Gables in North 
Weymouth. The new manageer 
was RAYMOND EWELL who was 
formerly employed by a Chicago 
concern. 



TOO LATE TO CLASSIFY 



FOUND, one lustrous and shining 
head of hair! Use "Sudley Sham- 
poo." That vivacious red head, 
JEAN BLENUS, says, "Ah, cet ees 
v underfill." 



SALEI Used cars. Buy now at 
WARD BALLARD'S modern 
garage! All in good shape, especially 
beach-wagons! 

WANT TO BE BEAUTIFUL? Go 
to CATHERINE COLASANTI'S 
exclusive beauty salon on Tremont 
Street. You feel and look like a 
new person! Appointments neces- 
sary. 

GIRLS! Do you want a beautiful 
new wardrobe at little cost? DOT- 
TIE HARTFORD'S Specialty Shop 
is the place for you. Miss Hartford 
will personally see that you are 
satisfied. 



BELIEVE IT OR NOT! We have 
hats that please both you and your 
husband. We are speaking, of 
course, of that exclusive millinery 
shop on Boylston Street. It's owned 
by famed BARBARA BRIGHAM. 

ITS A DOG'S LIFE! Are you a 
wife whom this slogan fits, slaving 
all day over a hot stove? If so, you 
need to visit KENNY GAY'S new 
bakery. Your husband will com- 
pliment you on your improved cook- 
ing. 

HAD ENOUGH? Then call upon 
Madame BARBARA DWYER at 
her "Moderne Beaute Salon." Men 
and women invited. Football 
players especially preferred. Start- 
ling change guaranteed. 

IT'S HERE! A new permanent 
wave and you can take advantage 
of it only at LILLIAN SCARPEL- 
LI'S beauty parlor. Make your 
appointment now. 



Twomey's trucking concern, 
owned and operated by GERALD 
TWOMEY, is the best in the 
country where quality in trucking 
is as well known as the "Grey- 
hound" is in bus transportation. 

Word has just been received that 
NELLIE WYSOCKI, one of Wey- 
mouth High's former pupils, is 
making out very well as the head 
seamstress in a famous Parisian 
shop. 

BARBARA HILL, the renowned 
Evangelist is now in South Texas 
converting the Mexicans. 



Page Twenty'seven 



12 



THE WEYMOUTH RECORDER 



CLASSIFIED ADS 



HAVE you a housing problem? 
Bring it to FRANCIS CLARK'S 
Real Estate office and your problem 
will be solved. Homes to suit every- 
one! 



IF you are particular about print 
ing, ANTHONY CARDINAL, 
is the one to see. Fast but efficient 
work guaranteed at his shop. 

DO you want a flawless complexion 
like that beautiful model, MARI- 
LYN HOLBROOK? Then use 
"Luvlee's Cream." Marilyn says, "I 
couldn't live without it." 

UNDER new management. The 
newly renovated Jason Theatre 
now owned by LOUISE MOLISSE 
will open Friday. Remember for 
an enjoyable evening that costs but 
a few pennies, it's the "Jason!" 

INVITE our representative to call 
and receive all the details on Up- 
To-Date Fashions. The new design- 
er of this firm is famous DORIS 
JOHANSON who can be consulted 
only by appointment. 

AT LAST you can be sure of a 
dependable hair-dressing service. 
We mean EDNA SARGENT'S 
Salon. Latest gossip, expert work 
all for a fair price. Come now. 

LISTEN 1 If you find it hard to 
keep up with the times, visit 
MARIE CASSASSA'S Dress Shop. 
You'll be "streamlined" and up-to- 
date always after shopping there. 

THE BEST SERVICE which can be 
offered you is given by BETTY 
BROWN'S Beauty Salon. Reason- 
able rates and dependable service. 

GRAND OPENING of the new 
night-club, the "Lamont Toujour," 
proprietor RAY LaMONTAGNE, 
featuring French food and French 
women. 



LET US do over your wardrobe for 
you. Come to Sheridan's new 
section where you'll find all the 
newest fashions. The new manager, 
SHIRLEY PRITCHETT, will be 
happy to advise you. 



TOO MUCH FOR YOU? Then let 
us help-Call "BILL" CROSS'S 
Trucking Service in Weymouth 
Landing. Dependable service. Guar- 
anteed to carry anything and 
everything. 



STOP being a wallflower. Attend 
CLAIRE NASH'S famous ballroom. 
Guaranteed a dancer after one- 
lesson. Reasonable Rates. 



VOTE for the best man. Be sure to 
put your X by PAUL ESTA- 
BROOK'S name on the ballot next 
Tuesday— to get things done right! 

BE smart and read that startling 
novel, "Germs and I" by that rising 
new novelist, MAHLON J. WOOD. 

ARK YOU listless and nervous? 
Get vim and vigor at ROALD 
HEITMAN'S model n bowling alleys 
and be the life of the party. 



ProfessionalNotes 



At a recent teacher's meeting at 
Weymouth High School, the names 
of the new members of the faculty 
were announced. Several of them 
were members of the class of 1917. 
They are: 

JEAN CHASE, who is teaching in 
the primary grades at the Abigail 
Adams School. Her smiling dispo- 
sition has made her a true friend of 
her pupils. 

JEAN FOPIANO, who is follow 
ing in the footsteps of Mr. Brown 
as an excellent English teacher. 

SHIRLEY OUELLET, who is 
also an English teacher, presides 
over her classes in 217. She makes 
English seem fun, not work. 

EVELYN FORREST, who is 
teaching fourth year Latin in room 
301. 

NANCY DORN, who is teaching 
a kindergarten class. Her cheerful 
disposition and sunny smile have 
met with great favor among the 
children. 

PATRICIA OLEARY, who is 
now the physical education instruc- 
tor. It is said that her experience 
in typing out gym exercises was 
what influenced her in choosing 
this as her career. 

GEORGE BUTLER, who has 
stepped into his father's shoes, and 
is now the truant officer at WHS. 

EVERETT DOW. who is now a 
teacher at the Trade School. He 
enjoyed the course so well, that he 
decided to return in the role of 
teacher instead of pupil. 

LOUISE COSTA-Louise is now 
a secretary for an insurance com- 
pany in Boston. 



COMMERCIAL 
NEWS 

Boston, July 5 (AP) —Local 114, 
the union of secretaries and steno- 
graphers, voted here yesterday to 
begin a book consisting of a short 
review of the careers of each of its 
members. The most important of 
these members are: 

NANCY AMES-Nancy is now 
the efficient and attractive secretary 
to a broker on Wall Street. 

NANCY BRDA— Nancy is now 
secretary for the president of a large 
firm in Boston. She attends night 
school after office hours. 

CAROL CHASE - Whenever 
you're in Tufts Library, you're sure 
to see Carol, ready and willing to 
help you. 

MARGARET DRAPER-Betty is 
now a private secretary to the 
owner of the Red Sox. She 
attributes her success to her interest 
in baseball. 

JULIA DURANTE-Julia has 
taken charge of Mr. Lyons' office 
and she has helped maintain its 
efficiency. 

FRANCIS FRAZIER - What 
would the Swedish Bakery do with- 
out "Butch," their new secretary? 

MARGARET GIOVANUCCI- 
Margaret has just achieved her 
greatest desire. She is now medical 
secretary to the chief surgeon at 
John Hopkins Hospital. 

DORIS GRIGGS— If your snap- 
shots haven't come out right, just 
bring them to the Alves Studio, 
where Doris is now head secretary. 

BARBARA HAMILTON— "Barb" 
is still an efficient stenographer and 
has recently entered a prosperous 
firm in Boston as private secretary 
to the vice-president. 

EDITH HAVEY-Edith is now a 
secretary for a large New York firm. 

JOAN HILLIARD— Joan, thanks 
to the excellent training which she 
received at Weymouth High School, 
is now private secretary to John D. 
Rockefeller. 

MEREDITH HOLBROOK _ 
After Meredith graduated with 
honors from a secretarial course, 
the business world gained an 
attractive and efficient worker. 

PAULINE JORDAN - Polly is 
now private secretary to an execu- 
tive in Radio City with her own 
office. Having achieved her am- 
bition, she now takes her friends to 
radio shows. 



Page Twenty'eight 



THE WEYMOUTH RECORDER 



13 



CLASSIFIED ADS 



EILEEN JOHNSON-Eileen is 
now employed as a receptionist at 
one of the larger New York business 
(inns. 

BARBARA KEEFE— "Barb" is 
now receptionist in a photography 
studio. She keeps everyone amused 
with her giggling. 

EILEEN KEEZER— Eileen is now 
secretary to that handsome new 
doctor in town, but it's rumored 
that he's going to lose a secretary 
and gain a wife. 

AUDREY LESLIE— Audrey is the 
quiet, but efficient, typist who 
always does her work well. 

BEATRICE MALERBRA— "Bea" 
is a receptionist in a doctor's office 
where she keeps all the patients 
happy. 

MILDRED MARCHILLO - 
"Millie" is now secretary to a young 
Boston lawyer. She always greets 
customers with a big smile. 

DOROTHY McRAE— "Dottie" is 
a private secretary to the boss at 
the Clutchem Safety Pin Co. 

ANTOINETTE MUSILLO - 
"Tony" is now private secretary to 
a large manufacturer. 

JEANNE NORVE-Jeanne's ex- 
cellence in the Business Course has 
"sold off." She is now the private 
secretary to Henry Ford III. 

GLORIA PETZE— Gloria finally 
has her wish. She's private secretary 
to a big executive in New York City. 

MARY RICHARDS - It is 
rumored that a certain pretty sten- 
ographei for a New York firm has 
all the male employees dazzled. 

ANNA ROBINSON— Anna, with 
her beloved shorthand as a back- 
ground, is happily employed as a 
secretary in Boston. 

DOROTHY SARNO-A local 
department store recently held a 
large celebration for one of its 
secretaries who had been with them 
since 1947. 

LUCILLE SHEPPARD-Lucille 
now works in Boston. Her cheerful 
disposition makes her a hit with all. 

LUCY STARRETT - Lucy is 
working in an office in Boston 
where she is very popular. 

BEVERLY STEARNS— "Bev" has 
returned to WHS, and, as Mr. 
Whittle's new secretary, she's to be 
congratulated. 

MARGARET TANGUY- Mar 
garet now works in Boston as a 
secretary. Is that tall dark-haired 
man your Ixjss, Maggie? 

KARIN THORNBERG - "Con- 
nie" is now private secretary for a 



Does your car need repairs. Bring it 
to KNUTE'S AUTO GARAGE for 
complete over-hauling. Quick and 
Dependable Service. — DONALD 
MILLER in charge. 

Listen Again Tomorrow! Starring 
that famous movie reporter 
THELMA RUMBLE. Startling up- 
to-the-minute headlines of today's 
movie capital. 

A FREE CAKE to everyone who 
buys at least one item at "BOB" 
GOODSPEED'S newly opened store! 
Come in and take advantage of this 
^reat offer today . 



Florida Insurance Co. Her leisure 
time is spent swimming at Miami 
Beach. 

OLGA VALDEZ— Olga is now a 
private secretary to Cary Grant in 
Hollywood. Who knows but that 
she may go into the movie business 
herself. 



WEYMOUTH PERSONALS 

After completing his college 
education, ARTHUR SEWELL is 
now installing the electricity in the 
new houses being built in Hanover. 

The owner of the Roger's Jewelry 
Shop has ventured into another 
businesss deal. She has just com- 
pleted plans for a new skating rink 
to be built in North Weymouth on 
the Great Hill Site. All this is 
being clone by that capable business 
woman LOUISE SIMMONDS. 

DOROTHY PITCHER recently 
left on a tour about the country, 
giving lectures on "The Perfect 
Secretary." 
Personals 

The former FRANCES PACK- 
ARD and her husband recently 
returned from a trip to Mexico to 
take up their residence in Wey- 
mouth. 

That new beauty salon located 
in South Weymouth is under the 
watchful eye of the attractive and 
capable MARY O'SULLIVAN. 

The local police force made 
public the list of new officers elected 
to serve on the force. Among these 
was JOHN SHEA, former member 
of Weymouth High School. 

The man behind the camera at 
the Capitol Theatre is none other 
than FRANKLIN SMITH. On 
Saturdays, however, Frank may be 
seen at Legion Field, taking photo- 
graphs of the football games. 



Do you want something new, 
something different in the way of 
clothes? Come to "Dolly's" dress 
shop, owned by that famous 
designer, DOROTHY SYMPSON. 
Latest in fashion. 



Chickens for sale. Thoroughbreds 
everyone. Come to FORTUNATO 
"TUNA" SERAFINI'S farm on 
Commercial Street. 



Do you need funeral facilities? 
Come to C. P. WHITTLE, II 
funeral home in Weymouth Land- 
ing. Quick and final arrangements. 

Does your hair need cutting? Yes? 
Come to RICHARD ANDERSON'S 
Barber Shop. Latest in hair cuts. 

REST up at that new Dude Ranch 
of GEORGE DeMELLO'S. It's tops 
in sports and entertainment. Learn 
to ride on one of his famed 
thoroughbreds. Make your reserva- 
tion now! 



THE best wood in New England 
sold by MATTHEW "HASH" 
DONADIO. Guaranteed to give off 
three times as much heat! Specially 
treated. Buy some before it's too 
late. 



YOU'LL SEE something different 
in each installment of that new 
magazine, "We Farmers," edited by 
much talked about JOHN K. TIR- 
RELL. Sign up for a ten year 
subscription. 



WANTED: A good paying position 
which will call for absolutely no 
hard work. Easily adapted to 
almost any position. Call ROBERT 
LEACH, Weymouth High Gradu- 
ate! 



NOW! Read the dramatic new love 
story in "Women's Home Journal" 
by the famous writer and pianist, 
LORRAINE KENDALL. "New, 
exciting, different," — New York 
Times. 



DON'T turn down dates because 
you can't dance. You can!— after 
one hour at the talented THERESA 
GALLANT'S Studios. Phone for 
an appointment today. You'll be 
glad you did! 

GOOD going bad? RONNIE 
NEILSON'S Ice Co. at once, quick 
dependable service. Our motto "Be 
wise like a fox, Put Neilson's ice in 
your refrigerator." 



<r^SV» Page Twenty-nine 



14 



THE WEYMOUTH RECORDER 



Clubs New and 

Old, Hit Stride 

The Book Club, conducted by 
Miss Gloster, resumed its meetings, 
while the French Club after an 
elapse of two years started again 
under the direction of Miss Can- 
ning, in 1946. A new club, the 
Weymouth High School Ski Club, 
under Mr. Cleaves, found its way 
into the hearts of students who love 
the outdoors. Other clubs that pre- 
vailed were the Projection Club of 
Mr. Ghiorse, Mr. Matthew's Chess 
Club, and the Teen-Age Book Club 
with Miss White. 

WEYMOUTH PERSONALS 

Have you seen that friendly driver 
that E. M. Dwyer recently 
employed? That is WILLIAM 
RENNIE, a former graduate of 
Weymouth High. All of "Bill's" 
customers are glad to see him 
coming for he is always ready with 
a cheerful smile. 

RICHARD BARKER recently 
opened another branch of his 



bakery in South Weymouth. 
"Dick's" bakery business is one of 
the most prosperous in the vicinity. 

KENNETH ROBERTS, filled 
with the zeal of a reformer from his 
earliest days, was recently ap- 
pointed as a resident missionary 
in South Weymouth. 

JEAN GEORGE, the well-known 
novelist, is now in the White 
Mountains where she is working on 
her greatest book. 

FRANCIS "TIGER" DeCOSTE 
inherited the Ouincy Market yester- 
day on the death of its owner, 
because of his many years of faith- 
ful service. 

The reason that the stores of the 
"Eastern Massachusetts Stop and 
Shop" are run so efficiently is that 
FRANCIS WEIDMAN is the new 
district manager. 

BRENDA BYRNE, the teacher 
who was recently recognized as the 
outstanding teacher in Massachu- 
setts, has now left the teaching 
profession to settle down with her 
husband in the country. 

Weymouth High's cafeteria is 



now under the new management of 
GEORGE GARDNER. George 
gicels all with a cheerful smile, and 
makes it a point to have special 
dishes for the teachers. 

RALPH WALO, who now owns a 
string of bowling alleys, was seen 
the other evening setting up pins. 
When Ralph was questioned aboul 
this, he replied that he enjoys gel- 
ting down into the pits, to teach 
he fine art of setting up pins to all 
his new pinboys. 

SOCIETY NOTES 

The class felt cpiite "grown 
up" this year, for it held a class 
party on April 12 with everyone 
having a splendid time. Shortly 
after this, members of the class put 
their heads together and found 
themselves enjoying a Junior Doll 
Day for the girls and a Junior 
Gangster Day for the fellows. The 
Senior Play, "Every Family Has 
One," was a huge success. On June 
27 the class "took-off" on its junior 
outing to Provinetown, thus ending 
the junior year perfectly. 



WEYMOUTH HIGH SCHOOL 
ALUMNI ASSOCATION 



The officers and members of the Weymouth High School 
Alumni Association congratulate the Class of 1947 and 
welcome them as fellow members of the Association. 

It is hoped that, as members of the Association, you 
will each take an active part in its functions. 

MRS. ALMA DRISCOLL, President 
RAYMOND HOLLIS, First Vice-President 
OLIVE HACKETT, Second Vice-President 
MARIE GHIORSE, Secretary 
FRANCIS X. KELLY, Treasurer 



Page Thirty *\&^ 



SPUES (SW^W? 




Page Thirty-two 



BETSEY ABBOTT 

South Weymouth — College Course Bets 
Musical Revue 2; Nominating Committee 3; 
Senior Party Committee 4; Fire Drill Duty 2, 3; 
Hume Room Messenger 1; Reflector Staff 3; 
Honors 1. 

It's nice to be natural when you're naturally niee. 

EDWARD ADAMS 

North Weymouth — College Course Ears, Ed 

( lass Prophecy, Chairman 4; Junior Party, Chair- 
man 3; Projection Club 3; Student Council 2; 
Assistant 4; Usher at Graduation 3; Wrestling. 
Manager 2; Football 2, 3, 4; Fire Drill Duty 
2. 3. 4. 

/ see no reason for a five-day school week. 



MARILYN ALLEY 

Weymouth — College Course 

Junior Party 3; Home Room Spelling Pee Champi- 
on i, 3, 4; Graduation Clothing' 4; Honors r, 2, 3. 
Silence is sweeter than speech. 

JAMES ALLISON 

South Weymouth — Sheet Metal Jimmic 

Class History 3; Exhibition 2, 3; Lunch Room 
Duty 3. 

Sir, / would rather be right than be President. 



DONALD ALMQUIST 

East Weymouth — College Course Dm 
Student Council 3, 4; Honors 2. 
A fellow with a lot of ability when he cares to use it. 

NANCY AMES 

North Weymouth — Business Course Nan 
Attendance Slips 4; Secretary of the Reflector 
Staff 4; Gregg Transcription Certificates for 60, 
80, words per minute 3 ; Senior Prom 4. 

Her disposition is as sunny as her hair. 



RICHARD ANDERSON 

North Weymouth — Business Course 

Quietness often shows worth. 



Dick 



RALPH ANDREA 

Holbrook — Agricultural Course 

Talking comes by nature; silence by wisdom. 



JOHN ANGELINE 

East Weymouth — College Course Jack, Angie 

Reflector Staff 2; Spring Track 3; Manager 2; 
Cross Country, Manager 2. 3, 4; Student Managers' 
Club 3; Class Will 4; Honors 3. 

I'm just the one that can do it. 

MARJORIE ARMSTRONG 

South Weymouth — Business Course Marge 
Junior Decorating 3; Projection Club 3; Weymouth 
Highlights 1. 2, 3; Gregg Transcription Certificate 
for 60 words per minute 3; Glee Club r; Class 
Outing 4. 

Why study history? I make it! 



BARBARA BAIRD 

South Weymouth — College Course Barb 
Class Prophecy 4; Teen-Age Book Club 4; French 
Club 4; Glee Club 1; Junior Outing Committee 3; 
Honors I, 2, 3. 

/ could say something; I believe I will. 



WARD BALLARD 

East Weymouth — College Course 

Good fellowship is beyond price. 



War die 























/ 












Ik 



c^SVj Page Thirty-three 













i 7 



















Page Thirty-four *\fi^> 



RICHARD BARKER 

South Weymouth — Agricultural Course Dick 
Home Room Spelling iiee Champion 2; Wrestling 4. 
Begone, dull care! Thou and 1 shall never agree. 

RICHARD BATES 

Whitman — Auto Repair Dick 
Class Secretary and Treasurer. 

It is not permitted to know all things. 



JOHN BAUMEISTER 

East Weymouth — General Course Johnny, Beau 
Track 1, 2; Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Lunch Room Duty 
4. Class Outing 4. 

/ can resist everything except temptation. 

ROBERT BELCHER 

East Weymouth — College Course Bob 
Senior Prom 4; Honors 3. 

Character is the key to fortune. 



JOHN BENSON 

South Braintree — Auto Repair Benny 
Class Will 3. 

The absent arc always in the wrong. 

JEAN BENTLEY 

Weymouth — College Course 

Class Will 4; Junior Decorating 3; Teen-Age 
Book Club, President 4; Reflector Staff 2, 3, 4; 
Glee Club 1; Home Room Messenger 3; French 
Club 4; Honors 1, 2, 3. Senior Play Properties 4. 
Although she looks gentle and shy. there's a 
twinkle of mischief in her eye. 



CARL BERGFORS 

East Weymouth — College Course Fcsterus 
Southwest High School. Brookside, Missouri i; 
Hasket Hall i; Tennis i. Stonehani High School 
2 ; Stoneham. Mass. Basketball 2. Weymouth 
High School 3, 4. Projection Club 4 ; Ski Club 4 ; 
Reflector Staff 4; Basketball 3; Cross Country 3, 
Captain 4; Orchestra 4; Class Outing, Chairman 4. 
There must be some hard work in him, but none of 
it ever came out. 

ROSEMARIE BIANCO 

East Weymouth — College Course Rosie 
Nominating Committee 4; Glee Club 1; Secretary 
to Mr. McCarthy 4; Graduation Dance 4. 

Gay good nature sparkles in her eyes. 



NORMAN BLANCHARD 

North Weymouth — Business Course Doc, Brownie 
He who invented work should have finished it. 

JEAN BLENUS 

East Weymouth- -Business Course Peggy 
A great big smile. 
A heart full of fun. 
A loyal friend to everyone. 



HENRY BOTCHER 

East Weymouth — General Course Hank 
Class Outing 3; Basketball 3, 4; Football i, 3, 4; 
Class Motto, Chairman 4. 

The answer to any jnaiden's prayer. 

LEO BOYLE 

North Weynmuth — College Course 
Senior Prom 4; Junior Decorating 3; French Club. 
Treasurer 4; Ski Club 4; Assistant Student Council 
3; Maroon and Cold 3; Band 2, 3, 4; Spring Con- 
cert 2, 3. 4; Winter Concert 3, 4; Senior Play 4; 
American Legion Oratorical Contest 4. 

Courteous , quiet, and modest, yet full of fun. 



WILLIAM BRADY 

East Weymouth — College Course Bill 

Baseball 2, 3. 4; Honors 3; Class Banquet 4. 

His friends, he has many; his foes has he any.' 

NANCY BRDA 

East Weymouth— Business Course 
Who's Who 4; Softball 1; Gregg Transcription 
Certificates for 60 and 80 words per minute 3, for 
100 words 4; Secretary to Mr. Lyond 4; Junior 
Decorating 3; Honors 1. 2. 3. 

A huffy disposition is u gift of nature. 



SHIRLEY BRENAN 

South Weymouth— College Course Shirl 
Student Council 1, _> ; Assistant Student Council 3, 
4; Usher at Winter Concert 4; Fire Drill Duty 1, 
a, 3, 4; Lunch Room 1, 2, 3, 4; Honors 1; Senior 
l'rom Committee 4. 

Sugar and sficc 

And ull things nice. 

MARY BRESNAHAN 

North Weymouth — Business Course 
CI. i" Prophecy 4; Assistant Student Council 2. .!. 
4; Glee Club 2; Home Room Messenger 1; Fire 
Drill Duty 3, 4; Lunch Room Duty 2. 3, 4; Gregg 
Transcription Certificate for 60 words per minute 
3; Usher at Senior Play 4. 

Laughing eyes and a merry smile. 

KARL BRIGGS 

East Weymouth — College Course 

Class History 4; Nominating Committee 3. 4; 
Usher at Football Games 4; Winter Track. Mana- 
ger 1, 2, 3, 4; Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 
2; Honors 1. 2, 3. 

His personality and uffeuranec are equally 
attractive. 



BARBARA BRIGHAM 

North Weymouth — Business Course 
Glee Club 2. 

A smile for each, a friend to all. 



B.B 



ROY BRIGHAM 

North Weymouth — General Course 
Football 1, 3; U. S. Navy 1944-1946. 
There's honesty, manhojd, und yood fellowship 
him. 



ELIZABETH BROWN 

East Weymouth — Business Course 
Glee Club 1 ; Class Banquet 4. 

Never miss enjoyment for homework ! 



Betty 



NATALIE BROWN 

South Weymouth — College Course Nat 
Class History 4; Usher at Concert 4; Fire Drill 
Duty 3; Honors 1; Class Motto 4. 

A merry heart muketh a cheerful countenance. 

EDWIN BURNETT 

North Weymouth — College Course 
U. S. Navy 1944-1946. 

Huffy am I, from care I am free. 



ROY BURR 

Quincy — Agricultural Course 
Graduation Clothing 4. 

Here is truly a fcrfect gentleman. 

GEORGE BUTLER 

East Weymouth — College Course Georgie 
Ski Club 4; Senior Party 4. 

His calm dignity and gentle way win him 
admiration every day. 




c^Stj Page Thirty'five 




BRENDA BYRNE 

South Weymouth — College Course 

Small and neat, winsome and sweet. 

ELSIE CAIN 

Weymouth — College Course Brick 
French Club 4; Usher at Senior Play 4; Home 
Room Messenger 4. 

Quiet, pensive, and demure. 



NANCY CAIN 

Weymouth Heights — College Course Candy 
Who's Who 4; French Club, Secretary 4; Hand 3, 
4; Choir 2, 3, 4; Orchestra 3. 4; Spring Concert 
2, 3. 4; Winter Concert 3, 4; Senior Play 4; Usher 
at Football (James 4; Home Room Messenger 3, 4; 
Junior High Office 4; High Honors [, 2. 3. 
To her will come the finest things of life, because 
to life she gives her best. 

ERNEST CAMPBELL 

Hingham — Carpentry Soufic 
Exhibition 2. 

Rest is a sweet source of labor. 

ANTHONY CARDINAL 

East Weymouth — Printing Tony 
Exhibition 2, 3 ; Baseball 1, 2. 

A good sport helps make a better man. 

SHIRLEY CARLSON 

North Weymouth — Business Course 
Nominating Committee 3; Business Manager of 
Maroon and Gold 3; Junior Outing 3; Junior Deco- 
rating 3; Class Will 4; Usher at Winter Conceit 
4; High Honors 1; Honors 2, 3; Gregg Transcrip- 
tion Certificate for 60 and 80 words per minute 3, 
100 words 4; Secretary to Mr. Lyond. 

Attractive and sweet, 

She's a joy to meet. 



GLADYS CARTER 

South Weymouth— Business Course Cladie 
Musical Revue i; Candy Girl at Football Games i; 
Glee Club i; Junior Party 3; Home Room Messen- 
ger 2; Class Banquet 4. 

A willing helper to all. 

ROBERT CARTER 

Weymouth Landing — College Course Bob 
Nominating Committee 4 ; Junior Party 3 ; Basket- 
ball 3; Lunch Room Duty 4; Class Banquet 4. 
As good a friend as his hair is red. 



RICHARD CARUSO 

East Weymouth — College Course Dick 
Who's Who 4; Junior Decorating 3; Student Coun- 
cil 1 , 2, 3 ; LTsher at Graduation 3 ; Basketball 1 , 
2, 3, 4 ; Football 1 . 2 ; Track 1 . 2 ; Honors 1 ; 
Lunch Room Duty 1, 2, 3, 4; Graduation Clothing 
4- 

The anszcer to a maiden's prayer. 

MARIE CASASSA 

East Weymouth — Business Course 
Everybody's friend. 



HELEN CASCIANI 

East Weymouth — College Course 

Student Council 2, 3, 4; Lunch Room Duty r, 2, 3, 
4; Home Room Messenger 2; Honors 1; Class 
Outing 4. 

Helen and good-looking clothes are synonymous. 

LAWRENCE CAULFIELD 

Weymouth — Sheet Metal Larry 
Wrestling 2; Exhibition 3; Class Banquet 4. 

All the minnows are not in the ocean. 



Page Thirty-six r \&^ 



ROBERT CAVANAGH 

South Weymouth — General Course Car 
Class Prophecy 4; Band t. 

// is better to be faithful than famous. 

CAROL CHASE 

North Weymouth- College Course 

Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 2; Honors 3; 

Class Outing 4. 

High-erected thoughts seated in the heart of 
courtesy. 



JEAN CHASE 

East Weymouth — College Course 

Class History 4; Teen-Age Book Cluh 4; Honors 

1, 3- 

Her manner quiet and her nature mild. 

SAM CHRISTIE 

East Weymouth — College Course 
Wrestling 2, 3; Honors 3. 

Stores of knowledge lie behind that placid glance. 



JCLIA CICCONE 

East Weymouth — Business Course Judy 
Hingham High School 1 ; Glee Club 1 ; Dramatic 
Club 1; Weymouth High School 2, 3, 4; Secretary 
to Miss Mayo 4; Junior Decorating 3; Senior 
Party 4. 

Judy's friendly spirit adds much to her merit. 

FRANCES CLARK 

North Weymouth — College Course Fran 
French Club 4. 

// silence were golden, 

Fran would be rich. 



ROBERT F. CLARK 

East Weymouth — General Course Bob 
Track I, 2, 3; Football 1, 2, 3; Student Council 3; 
Lunch Room Duty 2, 3; Advertising Club 4. 
To all who knozv him, he is bright and cheerful. 

ROBERT W. CLARK 

Weymouth Landing — General Course Clem, Bob 
Graduation Dance 4. 

A pleasing personality is the highway to success. 



CATHERINE COLASANTI 

East Weymouth— Business Course Cathy, Kay 

I'sher at Winter Concert 4; Nominating Committee 
4; Who's Who 4; Glee Club 1; Gregg Transcrip- 
tion Certificate for 60 and 80 Words per minute 3. 
100 words 4; High Honors 1 ; Honors 2. 

Laughing eyes and a merry smile. 

BARBARA CONDRICK 

Weymouth Landing — College Course Barb 
Sacred Heart High School i, 2; Weymouth High 
School 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2; Choir 1, 2; Freshman 
Party 1; Sophomore Party 2; Senior Party 4; 
Graduation Dance 4. 

A sunny disposition that would warm the coldest 
day. 

LORRAINE CONDRICK 

Weymouth Landing — Business Course 
Sacred Heart High School 1. 2; Glee Club 1. 2; 
Choir 1. 2; Freshman Party 1; Sophomore Party 
2; Weymouth High School 3. 4; Class Outing 4. 
Bright, cheerful, and gay. 
Like a sunny spring day. 

ELIZABETH CONNOLLY 

North Weymouth — Business Course Betty 
Class Prophecy 4; Candy Girl at Football Games 3; 
Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 1, 3; Gregg 
Transcription Certificate for 60 words per minute 
3; Honors 2. 

A vivacious brunette with sparkling eyes. 

































4r 



c^V» Page Thirty-seven 





If* v * , 








^^^^^^^^^^^^ 


At 








'\ • ""ITS'® y 





Page Thirty-eight *\&-? 



LOUISE COSTA 

East Weymouth —Business Course Shorty 
Gregg Transcription Certificate for no and 80 words 
per minute 3. 100 words 4; 4-H Club i, 2. 
Good things come in small packages. 

MELVIN COWE 

South Weymouth — Genera! Course Moo 
Quincy High School 1 ; Weymouth High School 2, 
3, 4; Baseball 1, 3; Football 1; Basketball 1; 
Senior Party 4. 

Why go to school when there is enjoyment outside? 



WILLIAM CROSS 

Weymouth Landing — General Course Bill 
Class Will 4 

Sir, I would rather be right than be President. 

JEAN CULLIVAN 

East Weymouth — Business Course Cully, Jrannic 
St 11. lent Council Assistant 4; Glee Club 1 ; Senior 
Play \; Home Room Messenger 4; Gregg Transcrip- 
tion Certificate for 60 words per minute 3; Sec- 
retary to Mr. Kelly 4; Graduation Clothing 4. 
Jean's always fair and square, 
As you can see by her red hair. 



JOHN CUSHEN 

East Weymouth — Auto Repair Limey 
Exhibition 3. 

He who proves too much proves nothing. 

JOSEPH DALTO 

East Weymouth — College Course Joe 
Nominating Committee 3 ; Senior Prom 4 ; Student 
Council 1 . 2, 3 ; Basketball 1, 2, 3 ; Football 2, 3, 
4; Lunch Room Duty j, 2, 3, 4. 

Handsome is as handsome does. 



JAMES DALY 

East Weymouth — General Course Bud 
Junior Party 3; Class Outing 3; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 
4 ; Basketball 3, 4 ; Lunch Room Duty 4 ; Gradua- 
tion Dance 4. 

Here I am. girls! 
Fight over me. 

JAMES DAMSTRA 

Hingham — Sheet Metal Jim 
Exhibition 2. 3; Class Banquet 4. 

Silence makes the mind grow wiser. 



ANTHONY DANIELE 

East Weymouth— -College Course Tony 
Class History 4 ; French Club 4 ; Orchestra 3; 
Spring Concert 3; Winter Concert 3; Basketball 

1, 2, 3. 4; Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 1, 

2, 3, 4; High Honors t, 2, 3; Senior Spelling Bee 
Champion 4. 

Padetewski, look out! 
DOROTHY DANIELSON 

Weymouth— Business Course Dot 
Class History 4; Attendance Slips 4; Gregg Trans- 
cription Certificate for 80 words per minute 3 ; 
Usher at Senior Play 4. 

/ could say something. 

I believe I will. 

SHIRLEY DEAN 

East Weymouth — Business Course Shirl 
Gregg Transcription Certificate for 60 and 80 words 
per minute 3, 100 words 4; Glee Club 1; Secretary 
to Miss Skala 4; Honors t, Class Banquet 4; 
Usher at Senior Play 4- 

Head and shoulders above the crowd. 

ANTHONY DEL BOSCO 

Weymouth Landing — General Course Del 
Niagara Falls High School 2, 3; Band 2. 3; Spring 
Concert 2, 3; Winter Concert 2. 3; Football 2, 3; 
Weymouth High School 4; Band 4; Orchestra 4; 
Winter Concert 4. 

Our genial drummer, may your years roll along in 
the same merry song! 



FRANCIS DECOSTE 

North Weymouth— Auto Repair 
A good sport. 

GEORGE DEMELLO 

East Weymouth — Cabinet making 

Pleasure comes before work. 



Tiger 



ROBERT DIZER 

East Weymouth — General Course 
Senior Prom 4. 

Seek and you shall find. 



Bob 



BURTON DOBLE 

East Weymouth — General Course Bud 
Class History Chairman 4; Eootball 2, 3. 4; Track 
l, 3. 4; Lunch Room Duty 2, 3, 4; Honors I. 
Not too serious, not too gay — a good fellow. 



MATTHEW DONADIO 

East Weymouth — General Course Hash 
Junior Varsity Football 3; Lunch Room Duty 1, 2, 
3, 4; Class Outing 4. 

Behind his wide grin is a trite friend. 

NANCY DORN 

Weymouth Landing — Business Course 

Nominating Committee 3; Junior Decorating 3; 

Class Secretary 3. 4; Lunch Room Duty 4. 

That's Nancy with the laughing eyes. 



EVERETT DOW 

East Weymouth — Cabinetmaking Tim 
Exhibition 2. 3. Who's Who 3. 

North Weymouth — Auto Repair Tiger 
A bright future lies ahead. 

JOHN DOYLE 

Weymouth Landing — Agricultural Course Jack 
Basketball 1, 2. 4; Senior Party 4; Class Banquet 
4- 

Napoleon was also a great man. 



MARION DOYLE 

North Weymouth — College Course 
Class Prophecy 4; Class Outing 3; Junior Party 3; 
Reflector Staff 4; Student Council Assistant 3; 
Maroon and Gold Manual 3; Glee Club t; Nominat- 
ing Committee 3. 

A winning smile is the keynote to her charm. 



MARGARET DRAPER 

East Weymouth — Business Course 
Glee Club 1, 2. 

She enjoys life in a quiet way. 



Betty 



JAMES DUCA 

East Weymouth — General Course Jimmy 
Basketball 3, 4 ; Football 3, 4 ; Lunch Room Duty 
1, 2, 3, 4; Graduation Dance 4. 

I'm weary of school and weary of books. 

But of sports I'll never tire. 

ERNEST DURANTE 

East Weymouth — Sheet Metal Ernie 
Senior Prom 3; Home Room Messenger 1; Exhibi- 
tion 2, 3. 

Never do today what you can do tomorrow. 




c^SV, Page Thirty-nine 







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■ I 

























JULIA DURANTE 

East Weymouth — Business Course Julie 
Student Council Assistant 4 ; Home Room Messen- 
ger 1 , 3; Junior High Office 4; Secretary to Miss 
Toomey 4; Glee Club t; Ski Club 4; Softball i t 2; 
Weymouth Highlights 2. 

Laugh and the world Icuffhs with you. 

BARBARA DWVER 

Weymouth Landing fiusiness Course Barb 
Junior Party 3 ; Cheer Leader 3, 4 ; Gregg Trans- 
cription Certificate for 60 words per minute 3. 
Small, petite, and full of pep, 
This little girl is really hep. 

JOHN DWVER 

East Weymouth — College Course Jack 
Ski Club 4; Weymouth Highlights 2; Kaseball 1; 
Honors [. 

Why be serious when there is enjoyment to be 
found around the corner? 

PAUL ESTABROOK 

South Weymouth— College Course Est, Esty 

Class Nominating Committee 4; I'sher at Football 
Games 4 ; Ticket Collector at Concert 4 ; Senior 
Play 4; Sports Editor, Weymouth Highlights 2; 
Hook Room Duty 2. 3, 4; Football 2; Cross Country 
■2. 3- 4; Track 1, 2, 3, 4; Intramural Basketball 1, 
2 ; Home Room Messenger 4 ; Grammar School 
Messenger 1, 2; Honors 1; Class Outing 4. 
Afoot and light-hearted 
I take to the open road. 

RAYMOND EVANS, JR. 

South Weymouth — College Course Ray 
Class Will 4; Track 4; Projection Club 3, 4; 
Camera Club 2, 3. Treasurer 4; Honors 3. 
/ am a man of few words. 

ETHEL EVANSON 

South Weymouth — -Business Course Blondie 
Book Room Duty 4; Gregg Transcription Certifi- 
cates for 60, 80, 100 words per minute 4; Honors 3. 
Small in stature, great in wit. 



RAYMOND EWELL 

Weymouth — Business Course Ray, Raymo, Raymic 
Christmas Party Committee 4. 

/ take things as they come — easy. 

NORMA FARRELL 

North Weymouth — Business Course Sharpie 
Junior Party 3; Christmas Party 4; Gregg Trans- 
cription Certificate for 60 words per minute 3. 
A beautiful face is the best letter of introduction. 



CHARLES FAl'LDS 

Weymouth — Auto Repair Chick 
U. S. Army 1942-1945 

Loyal in everything he docs. 

REX FENDERSON 

Weymouth — College Course Butch 
I'pper Darby High School, Upper Darby, Pa. i, 2; 
Football 1. Weymouth High School 3. 4. Football 
3, 4; Track 3, 4; Junior Party 3; Senior Prom 4. 
What's the use of hurrying ? I'll get there. 



PEARL FISHER 

East Weymouth — Home Economics Course 
Junior Decorating Committee 3. 

She who lii'cs obscurely and 
quietly has lived well. 



CORNELIUS FLYNN 

South Weymouth — College Course Neil 
Needham Jr. High School, Needham, Mass. 1; 
St. Paul's College, Covington. La. 2; Needham 
High School 3; Weymouth High School 4; U. S. 
Navy 19451946. 

Life's battle is a conquest for the strong. 



Page Forty *\ii-> 



JEANNE FOPIANO 

South Weymouth — College Course Jcannie 
Rockland High i; Choral Group i; Glee Cluh i; 
Weymouth High School 2, 3. 4; Public Speaking 
and Debating 2; Projection Club 3; Home Room 
Spilling Bee Champion 3; French Club 4; Camera 
Club, Secretary 3, President 4; Class Prophecy 4; 
Honors 1; Graduation Clothing 4. 

The way to make friends is to be one. 

EVELYN FOREST 

East Weymouth — College Course Eve, Sis 

French Club 4; Teen-Age Hook Club 4; Projection 
Club 3; Lunch Room Cashier 1, 2; Reflector Staff 
2; Book Club 4; Graduation Dance 4; Honors 1, 2. 
3- 

The blonde gentlemen prefer. 

MARY FRASER 

Kast Weymouth — College Course 
Home Room Messenger 1 ; Camera Club 3, Secre- 
tary 4; Projection Club. Secretary 3, 4; Teen-Age 
Book Club 4; Who's Who 4. 

Many come and many may go 
But few like her do any know. 

FRANCES FRAZIER 

South Weymouth — Business Course Butch 
Nominating Committee 3; Home Room Spelling Bee 
Champion I. 

The blush is beautiful, but 
sometimes it is inconvenient. 



TERESA GALLANT 

Weymouth — Business Course Terry, Pat 

Home Room Messenger 1, 3; Class Outing 4. 
She's the definition of a good sport. 

JOHN GALLIAN 

Weymouth Heights — General Course Bud 
Track I, 2. 3. 4; Football I, 2. 3, Co-Captain 4; 
Home Room Messenger I, 3; Class Outing 4. 
A man broad-brained and broad-shouldered to do 
the job. 



EDWARD GARDNER 

East Weymouth- — Cabinet making Ed 
Senior Prom 3; Baseball 1; Lunch Room Duty 3; 
Exhibition 2, 3. 

Happy am I, from care I'm free. 

Why cant they all be contented like me? 

GEORGE GARDNER 

East Weymouth — Business Course 
Senior Play, Properties 4. 

// silence is golden, he'll be poor all his life. 



KENNETH GAY 

Weymouth — Business Course Ken 
Junior Outing 3. 

His thoughts are his own. 

JEAN GEORGE 

Weymouth — College Course Georgie, Toots 

Reflector Staff 2, 3; Weymouth Highlights 2; 
Library 3; Prize for Mexican Art Exhibit; Honors 
1, 3; Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 4. 
A companion that is cheerful is worth gold. 



DORIS GERRY 

South Weymouth — Business Course Dot 
Home Room Messenger 1 ; Gregg Transcription 
Certificates for 60 and 80 words per minute 3, 
for 100 words 4. 

Why work when play is so much more fun? 

MARGARET GIOVANUCCI 

East Weymouth — Business Course Peggy 
Gregg Transcription Certificates for 60 and 80 
words per minute 3, for 100 words 4; Secretary 
to Mr. Gutterson 4; Honors 1, 2. 3. 

A good secretary is an excellent asset. 





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r^V* Page Forty'One 




ROBERT GOODSPEED 

South Weymouth — College Course Goose 
New Bedford High School i, 2; Traffic Squad 1, 
2; Junior R. O. T. C. 2; Dramatic Club, Vice- 
President 2; Weymouth High School 3, 4; Mana- 
gers Club 3; Baseball, Junior Manager 3. 
"All great men are dying" saith the book. "And 
I feel sick myself", saith Bob. 

LOIS GOULD 

East Weymouth — College Course 
Reflector Staff 3. 4; Nominating Committee 3; 
Assistant Student Council 3; Class Prophecy 4. 
Gentle thoughts and calm desires. 

JEAN GOURLEY 

South Weymouth — Business Course Husky, Chubby 
Nominating Committee 4; Class Will 4; Projection 
Club 3. 

Carefree and gay the lifelong day. 

DORIS GRIGGS 

East Weymouth — Business Course Dorrie 
(ilee Club t, 2; Choir 1; Junior Decorating Com- 
mittee 3; Usher for Senior Play 4. 

When Doris is near zee have lots of fun, 
But never get our home work done. 



BARBARA HAMILTON 

Weymouth — Business Course Barb 
Musical Revue i ; Reflector Staff 4; Gregg Trans- 
cription Certificates for 60 and 80 words per minute 
3, for 100 words 4 ; Usher for Senior Play 4; 
Honors 1. 3. 

Hair that's blond, eyes so blue, 
She's a friend zvho's always true. 

DONALD HANNAFORD 

South Weymouth — Auto Repair Don 
Choir 2. 3 ; Winter Concert 2, 3 ; Exhibition 2. 
M usic hath charms for him. 



DOROTHY HARTFORD 

Weymouth- -College Course Dotty 
Class History 4 ; Home Room Messenger 1 ; 
Honors 1. 

Openly quiet but often fools us. 

CHARLES HASTIE 

North Weymouth- — College Course Charlie 
Projection Club 3; Camera Club 1, Vice-President 
3; Laboratory Assistant 3, 4; Class History 4; 
Honors 1 . High Honors 2, 3. 

A man can succeed in 

anything he undertakes; 

It is all a matter of zvill. 



EDITH HAVEY 

East Weymouth — Business Course 

Gregg Transcrption Certificates for 60 and 80 

words per minute 3, for 100 words 4; Who's Who 

4; Honors r, 2, 3. 

Her quiet dignity and simple way 
IV in her admiration every day. 

ROALD HEITMANN 

East Weymouth — -College Course 
Chess Club 3; Ski Club, Adviser 4. 

Never do today what you can do tomorrow. 



BARBARA HILL 

Weymouth — College Course Barb, Barby 

Girls' Softball 1; Home Room Spelling Bee Champ- 
ion 1; Alternate School Messenger 2. 3; Projection 
Club, Instructor 3. 

A friend to all who know her. 

JOAN HILLIARD 

North Weymouth — Business Course Jo 
Class Will 4; Gregg Transcription Certificates for 
60 and 80 words per minute 3, for 1 00 words 4 ; 
Secretary to Miss Flaherty 4 ; Honors 3. 
Happy-go-lucky, everyone's friend. 
Lively the hours with her we spend. 



Page Forty'two "AiS^ 



CHARLES IIOLBROOK 

Weymouth Sheet Metal Charlie 
Wrestling 2; Choir 2; Exhibition 2, 3. 

Never worry; it doesn't pay. 

MARILYN HOLBROOK 

South Weymouth College Course Mai 
Glee Club IJ Fire Drill Duty 1; L'sher at Winter 
Concert 4; Home Room Messenger 4; Honorary 
Member of the Old Colony Club 4; Banquet 4; 
Honors 1. 3. 

And her modest answer and graceful air 

Show her wise as she is fair. 



Ml REDITH HOLBROOK 

South Weymouth — College Course Twin 
Glee Club 1; Junior Party Committee 3; Fire Drill 
Duty 4; Usher at Winter Concert 4; Banquet 4; 
Honors 3. 

A laughing eye, a merry smile, 
Will always make a girl worth-while. 

DAVID IIUNTOON 

East Weymouth — General Course Dave 
A short saying contains much wisdom. 



DONALD BISHOP 

South Weymouth — Printing Mitsi 
Graduation Dance 3; Lunch Room Duty 3: U. S. 
Navy 1944-1946. 

Full of sfirit. full of fun. 

pull of pep that gets things done. 

JUNE JERPI 

South Weymouth -Business Course Junic 
(ilee Club 1 ; Gregg Shorthand Certificate for 60 
words per minute 3; Class Outing 4. 
Always cheerful and full of fun. 
With a gleaming smile that rivals the sun. 



DORIS JOHANSON 

East Weymouth — Business Course Jo 
Gregg Shorthand Certificates for 60 and 80 words 
per minute 3; Honors 1. 

// silence is golden, it is a good thing we're off 
the gold standard. 

PETER JOHNSON 

East Weymouth — College Course Scotty, Pete 

Class Outing 3; Senior Prom 4; Junior Party 3; 
Cross Country 2. 3; Track 2, 3, 4; Book Room 
Duty 1, 2, 3. 4. 

Good fellowship is beyond price. 



EILEEN JOHNSTON 

East Weymouth — Business Course Red 
Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 3; Gregg 
Transcription Certificates for 60 and 80 words per 
minute 3; Class Banquet 4; Honors 1, 2. 

Always ready with a smile. 

And one that makes our life worth while. 

JANETTE JONES 

Weymouth — General Course Butterfly, Jan 

Cupid hath not, in all his quiver's choice. 
An arrow for the heart like a sweet voice. 



BEVERLY JORDAN 

Weymouth — College Course Bev, Radar 

liook Club 4; French Club 4; Reflector Staff 2. 3, 
Editor 4; Majorette 3, Co-head Majorette 4; Spring 
Concert 3; Winter Concert 3; Senior Play 4; 
Honors I. 

Personality , plus I 

PAULINE JORDAN 

South Weymouth — Business Course Polly 
Class Will 4; Gregg Transcription Certificate for 
60 words per minute 3; Usher at Senior Play 4; 
Honors 1. 

Don't measure her personality by her height. 





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c^Vj Page Forty-three 




Page Forty'four 



SHIRLEY JOYCE 

Weymouth— College Course Shift 
Class History 4; Choir 2; Glee Cluh 1. 
Behold, my security is insured, for my life tzvo 
men doth enfold. 

DOROTHY KEEFE 

Weymouth — business Course Barb 
Glee Club 2; Attendance 4; Usher Winter Concert 
4; Gregg Shorthand Certificate for 60 words per 
minute 3; Class Banquet 4. 

I'm laughing on the outside, laughing on the inside. 

CLAYTON STONE 

South Weymouth — Business Course Stonie, Clayt 
Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Track 3, 4; Home Room Spelling 
Bee Champion 1 ; Who's Who 4 ; Reflector Staff 
4; Attendance Slips 4; Home Room Messenger for 
107, 4; Winter Concert 2, 3, 4; Spring Concert 
2, 3. 4; Honors 1, 2; Advertising Club A- 
Ahvays merry and bright. 

LORRAINE KENDALL 

North Weymouth — Business Course Shorty, Blackic 
Who's Who 4; Gregg Transcription Certificates 
for 60 and 80 words per minute 3, for 100 words 
per minute 4; Treasurer for Home Room 4; Sec- 
retary to Miss Gloster 4; Senior Play 4; American 
Legion Oratorical Contest 4 ; Attendance Slips 4 ; 
Honors 2. 

Always cheerful, ahvays kind, 
Such a girl we like to find. 

EILEEN KEZER 

North Weymouth — Business Course 
Nominating Committee.); Senior Party Committee 
4; Reflector Staff 2, 3, 4; Drum Majorette 2, 3, 
Head Majorette 4; Gregg Transcription Certificate 
for 60 words per minute 3; Junior High Office 2; 
Class Banquet, Chairman 4. 

She zvalks in beauty in a field of men. 

ROBERT KING 

East Weymouth — General Course Bob 
Senior Prom 4; Band 1, 2. 3; Orchestra 2, 3; 
Spring Concert 2, 3; Winter Concert 3. 

Give me women or give me death! 



MARGARET ALLAN KNOX 

East Weymouth — College Course Peggy. Maggie 
Senior Prom 4; Honors 1. 3. 

A person modeled from life's good products. 

BERTHA LaMONTAGNE 

East Weymouth — College Course Bert 
Class Prophecy 4; French Club 4; Reflector Staff 
3, 4; Junior Party 3; Junior Decorating 3; Honors 
1 , 3 ; Class Outing 4. 

Fun is my ivatch word. 



RAYMOND LaMONTAGNE 

East Weymouth — General Course FrcncUic 
Lunch Room Duty 3 ; Track 1 ; Football 1 . 3 ; 
Book Room Duty 3. 

Why worry? The future will take care of itself. 

ALBERT LANDERS 

Weymouth — Business Course Spook 
Managers Club 3, 4; Projection Club 3. 4; Base- 
ball Manager 3, 4; Honors 1, 3. 
Silence is golden; and often the first step to success. 



MICHAEL LaROCCO 

East Weymouth — General Course Mike 
Football 1, 2, 3. 4; Wrestling 2, 3; Lunch Room 
Duty 1, 2, 3. 4; Baseball 4; Fire Drill Duty 2, 3, 
4- 

His szveaters arc as nice to look at as he is, 
and equally as gay. 

ARNOLD LASSE 

North Weymouth — General Course 

Projection Club 3; Cross Country 2, 3; Track 1, 

2, 3- 

"Oh, why don't the girls leave me alone!" 



ROBERT LEACH 

East Weymouth Auto Repair Bob 
Virtue is the only nobility. 

ROBERT LEGGETT 

Weymouth --General Course Bob 
Junior Decorating 3; Lunch Room Duty 4; Fire 
Drill Duty 3. 4; Nominating Committee 4. 
His personality rates high with everyone. 



WILLIAM LEONE 

East Weymouth— Sheet Metal Billy 
football -•. 3; Baseball -• ; Who's Who 3; Exhibi- 
tion 2, 3. 

A good worker, a better sport, and yet a better 
friend. 

AUDREY LESLIE 

South Weymouth Business Course Lcs 
Reflector Secretary 4; Usher for Senior Play 4; 
Class Outing 4. 

So quiet until you know her! 



HELENA LeVANGIE 

North Weymouth — Business Course Ann 
Class Prophecy 4; Nominating Committee 3; Junior 
Decorating 3; Reflector Secretary 4; Home Room 
Messenger 3; (iregg Transcription Certificates for 
60 and 80 words per minute 3; Honors 1, 2. 
Winning each heart and delighting each eye. 

WILLIAM LeVANGIE JR. 

East Weymouth — Business Course Bill 
Reflector Staff 2, 3. 4; Lunch Room Duty 3, 4; 
Fire Drill Duty 3, 4; Track 1. 

"Why can't I leave the girls alone!" 



RICHARD LIVA 

Weymouth — General Course Dick, Spit 

Football 1, 2. 3, 4; Track 1, 2. 3, Captain 4; 
Baseball 1, 2, 3, Captain 4; Fire Drill Assistant 4. 
A fine sport in everything he does. 

FRED LOUD 

East Weymouth — Business Course 
Class Treasurer 3, 4; Junior Party 3; Assistant 
Student Council 3; Usher at Graduation 3; Base- 
ball 1. 2, 3, 4; Football 1, 2. 3. 4; Fire Drill 3, 4; 
Honorary Member of the Rotary Club 4. 

His witty replies come ever quickly. 



WILLIAM LUSCOMBE 

North Weymouth — College Course Slim 
Track 1. 2. 3; Wrestling 2; Lunch Room Duty 
1, 2, 3; Football 3; U. S. Army 1945-1947. 
A happy-go-lucky fellow who likes athletics better 
than studies. 

PATRICIA MacLEOD 

East Weymouth — Home Economics Patty 
Durham High School, Durham. North Carolina 2 ; 
Anniston High School, Anniston, Alabama 3; Wey- 
mouth High School 1, 4; Home Room Messenger 
1; Miss Benson's Messenger i; Class Will 4. 
IVatch out for those sparkling eyes! 



GREGORY MACRI, JR. 

South Weymouth— General Course Greg, Mac 

Wrestling, Assistant Manager 3, Manager 4; Lunch 
Room Duty 2. 3. 4. 

Better late than never. 

FAY MADDY 

East Weymouth — College Course "Petunia" 
Glee Club 1. 2; Musical Revue 2; Cafeteria 2; 
Assistant Student Council 3. 4; Lunch Room Duty 
3, 4; Fire Drill Duty 4; Class History 4; Usher 
at Winter Concert 4; Book Club 4; French Club 4. 
Who knows what lies behind her merry smile? 




c^V, Page Forty-five 



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Page Forty-six ^V&J 



BEATRICE MALERHA 

East Weymouth — Business Course Bea 
Cregg Transcription Certificates for 60 and 80 
words per minute 3, for 100 words 4; Graduation 
Clothing 4. 

The eyes are the mirrors of the soul. 

MILDRED MARCHILLO 

South Weymouth — Business Course Millie 
Who's Who 4; Secretary to Mr. Cleaves 4; Gregg 
Transcription Certificates for 60 and 80 words per 
minute 3, for 100 words 4; Honors I, 3. 
When she will, she will: 
When she won't, she simply will not. 

MARIAN MARTELL 

Weymouth — Business Course 

Choir 3; Glee Club 2; Musical Revue 2; Gregg 
Transcription Certificates for 60 and 80 words per 
minute 3. 

She has a shy smile — or is it mischievous ? 

SALLY MATHEWS 

Weymouth — College Course Sal 
Senior Prom 4; Junior Decorating 3; French Club 
4; Band 3. 4; Orchestra 3, 4; Choir 2, 3, 4; Spring 
Concert 2. 3. 4; Winter Concert 3, 4; Home Room 
Messenger 2, 3, 4; Home Room Spelling Bee 
Champion 3, 4; Delegate to Massachusetts Girls' 
State 3; High Honors [, 2. 3. 

Not only a complexion of peaches and cream, 
but hair that shines and eyes that (/learn. 

BERNARD MATTIE 

East Rraintree — Auto Repair Barney 
Exhibition 2, 3. 

Willing and able. 

james McCarthy, jr. 

Weymouth — College Course Mac 
Class History 4; Projection Club 3: Student Coun- 
cil 3, 4, President 4 ; Basketball 1 , 4 ; American 
Legion Representative at Boys' State 3; High 
Honors 1, 2 ; Honors 3. 

A lad with possibilities. 

GEORGE McCUE 

Weymouth — College Course Biff 
Class Prophecy 4; Class Party 4; Junior Party 3; 
Usher at Graduation 3; Home Room Spelling 
Bee Champion 2; High Honors 1, 2; Honors 3. 
He may seem quiet and also shy, 
But when you know him — oh, my! 

WILLIAM McINTOSH 

East Weymouth- — Business Course Mac 
Class Vice-President 3, 4; Junior Party 3; Base- 
ball 2. 3, 4; Football 2, 3. 4; Basketball Manager 2. 
3, 4; Usher at Graduation 3; Assistant Student 
Council 3; Member of Rotary Club 4. 

Everyone likes that fellow! 

AUDREY McKENNA 

North Weymouth — Business Course Irish, Audie 
Senior Party 4 ; Candy Girl at Football Games 3 ; 
Senior Play 4 ; Graduation Dance 4. 

Happy am I; from care I am free. 

ROBERT McLELLAN 

North Weymouth — College Course Mac 
Hingham High School i, 2, 3; Graduation Usher 3; 
Assistant Home Room Manager 3; Junior Execu- 
tive Board 3; Dramatic Club 1; Weymouth High 
School 4; Ski Club 4. 

It's a plague to be a handsome man. 



JOANNE McMERRIMAN 

South Weymouth — College Course Squeak 
Braintree High School i ; Weymouth High School 
2, 3, 4 ; Assistant Student Council 3 ; Student 
Council 4 ; Victory Dance Committee 4 ; Senior 
Prom 4. 

A girl who grew up but whose voice did not. 
ANNE McNAMARA 

North Weymouth — Business Course Pete 
Junior Party 3; Gregg Transcription Certificate 
for 60 and 80 words per minute 3. 100 words 4; 
Lunch Room Duty 1: Usher at Senior Play 4; 
Graduation Clothing Committee 4. 

Cay good nature sparkles in her eyes. 



DOROTHY McRAE 

East Weymouth Business Course Dot, Mac 

Bi-.-iintrce 1 1 School i. 2; Safety Driving Club 
• ■ Weymouth High School 3, 4 ; Nominating Com- 
mittee 4; Senior Prom 4; Home Room Messenger 

Sometimes she seems so very shy, 
But there is a twinkle in her eye. 

BARBARA MESSIER 

Weymouth Height- College Course Barb 
Class Prophecy 4; Nominating Committee 3 ; Junior 
Decorating j ;' Ski Club 4; Student Council 3, 4; 
Softball 1; Lunch Room Duty 4; Victory Dance 4; 
Honors I, 3- 

Her friends she has many. 

Her foes has she any ' 



WILLIAMS MILLS 

Weymouth Heights College Course Bit' 
Band !. 4; Orchestra 1, J. 3. 4; Choir 3, 4: Win- 
ter Concert 3, 4; Spring Concert 3, 4; Senior 
Play 4; Cross Country 2, 3. 4; Track 1. 2. 3. 4- 
A little nonsense now and then 
Is relished by the wisest men. 

LOUISE MOLISSE 

East Weymouth — General Course Lou 

Advertising Club 4- 

IVhen Louise is about, we have lots of fun, 
But never (let our home work done. 



HERBERT MORSE 

Cohasset - Agricultural Course Sonny 
Graduation Clothing 4. 

The man who blushes is not quite a brute. 

KENNETH MUNROE 

East Weymouth — General Course Bullet 
Baseball I, 2. 3. 4; Lunch Room Duty 1. 2, 3. 4- 
He who rises late must trot all day. 



JOHN MURPHY 

East Weymouth- College Course Murph 
Class Will 4; Home Room Spelling Hee Champion 
1; Honors 1; Senior Play Ticket Collector 4. 
A i/ood natured man is he. 

ANTOINETTE MUSCILLO 

East Weymouth — Business Course Toni, Ann 

Advertising Staff for Football Souvenir 4; Usher 
at Senior Play 4; Advertising Club 4- 
She may seem quiet and also shy. 
But if you knew her — oh, my! 



CLAIRE NASH 

East Weymouth — Business Course 
Class Will 4; Home Room Messenger 4: Lunch 
Room Cashier 1, 2; Gregg Transcription Certificate 
for 60 and 80 words per minute 3. 100 words 4; 
Junior Outing 3. 

She enjoys life in an easy way. 

JEAN NASH 

North Weymouth - College Course Jen 

Class Prophecy 4; Student Council 3. 4; Lunch 
Room Duty 4; High Honors 1, 2. 3. 

Genius, wherefore didst thou (jet thy brains? 




RONALD NEILSON 

North Weymouth — General Course Ronnie 
Quincy High School 1, 2; Weymouth High School 
3. 4- 

He'll surprise us yet. 

HAROLD NELSON 

East Weymouth — Sheet Metal Peewee 
Class Prophecy 3; Lunch Room Duty 3; Exhibition 
2, 3- 

One couldn't ask for a better friend. 




c^V» Page Forty'seven 




RICHARD NELSON 

East Weymouth — Agricultural Course Dick 
Why aren't they all content tike met 

JACOB NESSON 

East Weymouth — Business Course Jack 
Nominating Committee 4; Ski Club 4; Track 
Manager 2. 3, 4; Cross Country 3; Lunch Room 
Duty 2, 3; Hook Koom Duty 3, 4, Advertising 
Club 4. 

Liked by all who know him. 



JOSEPH NEVINS 

North Weymouth — College Course Joe 
Band 1, 2, 3; Nominating Committee 3. 

Friends; though absent, are still present. 

WALLACE NEWC0MI5 

South Weymouth — Sheet Metal IVally 
Class History 3. 

Why study? I'll pass. 



JEANNE NORVE 

East Weymouth — Business Course Red 
Who's Who 4; Book Club 4; Projection Club 3; Ski 
Club 4; Honors 1, 3; Home Room Messenger 3; 
Gregg Transcription Certificate for 60 and 80 
words per minute 3, for 100 and 120 words 4; 
Secretary to Mr. Nelson 4. 

Her blush is beautiful, but sometimes inconvenient. 

PATRICIA O'LEARY 

East Weymouth — Business Course Pat 
Projection Club 3. 4; Ski Club 4; Advertising 
Staff 4; Usher at Concert 4; Home Room Messen- 
ger 1; Secretary to Miss Peterson 4; Graduation 
Dance 4; Advertising Club 4. 

A girl who is quiet only in school. 



GEORGE O'NEILL 

East Weymouth- — College Course Bud, Pidgc 

Class History 4; Junior Decorating 3; Wrestling 1; 
Football 2 ; Winter Track 3. 4; Spring Track 3 ; 

Home Room Treasurer 3; Honors 1, 2, 3; Home 

Room Spelling Hee Champion 4 ; Senior Play 
Ticket Collector 4. 

Quiet, yet alert and full of fun. 

MARY O'SULLIVAN 

South Weymouth — Business Course Mary-0 

Glee Club 1, Advertising Club 4. 

A cute little red-head with mischief in her eyes. 



SHIRLEY OCELLET 

Weymouth — College Course Shirl 

Junior Decorating 3 ; Glee Club 1 ; Musical Revue 
1; Senior Play 4; Honors 3. 

Quiet, ever so quiet, but not unattraetively so. 

FRANCES PACKARD 

East Weymouth— General Course Fran, Franny 
Ski Club j; Home Room Messenger 2. 3; Adver- 
tising Staff for Football Souvenir 4 ; Advertising 
Club 4. 

Some play zvhile others work. 



DAVID PAULSON 

North Weymouth — General Course Dave 
Who's Who 4; Choir 4; Glee Club 2, 3; Track 
2, 3; Football 3; U. S. Navy, April 1944 to June 
1046. 

No mind is so thoroughly well organized that it is 
deficient in a sense of humor. 

SALVATORE PEPE 

East Weymouth — General Course Sam 
Intramural Basketball; Honors 1. 

/ take things as they come. 



Page Forty-eight *W 



BARBARA l'HRRV 

Fast Weymouth— Home Economics Barb 
Quiet, but liked by all. 

CARL PETERSON 

Weymouth Landing —College Course Pete 
Class History 4; Nominating Committee 3; Junior 
Decorating 3; Projection Club 3; Ticket Collector 
at Concert; Csher at Football Games; Honors 3; 
Home Room Spelling Hee Champion 3; Junior 
Kotarian: Usher at Graduation 3; Senior Play 
Ticket Collector 4. 

.-! must efficient man with music in his soul. 



KENNETH PETERSON 

South Weymouth — Carpentry Pete 
Junior Decorating 3; Class Vice-President 3; Lunch 
Koom Duty 3. 

A toast to an all-round good fellow. 

(TORI A PETZE 

Kast Weymouth — Rusiness Course Glo 
Lunch Room Cashier 1, 2; Honors 2; Junior Out- 
ing Committee 3; Gregg Transcription Certificate 
for bo and 80 words per minute 3. 100 words 4; 
t'slier at Winter Concert 4; Senior Play Prompt- 
ress 4; Class Outing 4. 

Silence is golden, but who wants to be rich? 



DOUGLAS PICKARD 

East Weymouth — General Course Doug 
A sense of humor is a great asset. 

ROBERT PIERCE 

North Weymouth — Auto Repair Bob 
Who's Who 3; Exhibition 2; V. S. Navy 1944- 

1946. 

Silence is wisdom and gets a man friends. 



DOROTHY PITCHER 

South Wevmouth — College Course Pot 
Peabody H'igh School 1, 2. 3; Softball 1, 2, 3; Wey- 
mouth High School 4; Teen Age Book Club 4. 
A true and loyal friend always willing to help. 

THOMAS PITCHER 

South Weymouth — General Course Tom 
Peabody High School 1, 2, 3; Baseball 3; Wey- 
mouth High School 4. 

Great hunter, how's the cold? 



WARREN PORTER 

North Weymouth — General Course Dink 
Football 1, 2. 3. 4; Track 1, 2, 3, 4; Lunch Room 
Duty 2, 3. 

There's mischief in his smile. 

HENRY POULIN 

Weymouth Landing — General Course Bud 
A worldly fellow who takes things as they come. 



SHIRLEY PRITCHETT 

South Weymouth — College Course Shirl 

Class Will 4; Junior Decorating 3. 

She's never still one moment, but who wants to be? 

GORDON RAUCH 

Weymouth Landing — College Course 
Football 3; Honors 1. 2, 3. 

He worries not, he hurries not, 

His calm is undisturbed. 




<^5V» Page Forty'nine 




CONRAD REED 

Pembroke — Sheet Metal Connie 
Class Will 4; Choir [, 2; Spring Concert 2; 
Winter Concert 1 ; Exhibition 2. 3. 
He is still trying to put Pembroke on the map. 

SHIRLEY REIDY 

East Weymouth — College Course Sl.irl 
Class Prophecy 4; Junior Decorating 3; Senior 
Play 4; Drum Majorette 2; Softball 1; Honors 1. 
Personality is the first rung up the ladder of success. 



WILLIAM RENNIE, JR. 

Weymouth Landing — (ieneral Course Billie 
Basketball 1, 2, 3. 4; Baseball 1, 3. 4; Lunch 
Room Duty 1, 2, 3, 4; Junior L'sher at Graduation 
3, Graduation Dance 4. 

Kerer a dull moment. 

DAVID RESNICK 

South Weymouth — College Course Dave 
Band 1. 2, 3. 4; Weymouth Highlights Staff 1, 2; 
Reflector Staff 3, 4; Junior Decorating 3; Junior 
Party 3; Nominating Committee 4; Senior Prom 4; 
Decoration for Athletic Dance 4; Projection Club 
3; Spring Concert 2. 3. 4; Winter Concert 2, 3. 4; 
Honors 3; Senior Party 4; Home Room Spelling 
Bee Champion 4; Senior Play Ticket Collector 4. 
Friendship is the key to happiness. 



MARY RICHARDS 

North Weymouth — Business Course Terry 
Student Council Assistant 3; Ski Club 4; Advertis- 
ing Club 4; Graduation Dance 4. 

Her friendly smile and pleasant air 

Quickly bequile the unaivare. 

KENNETH ROBERTS 

Wevmouth Landing — College Course Ken 
Forever smilina. ahvays on the go, 
From his blithe spirit happiness doth flow. 



FRANK ROBERTSON 

Braintree — Auto Repair Robbie 
Exhibition 2; Class Outing 3. 

Labor conquers everything. 



NEWTON ROBERTSON 

Weymouth Heights — (ieneral Course Dezvey 



ANNA ROBINSON 

East Weymouth — Business Course Smitty 
Home Room Messenger 2; Gregg Transcription 
Certificate for 60 and 80 words per minute 3, 
100 words 4. 

A true friend is the greatest of all blessings. 

ROBERT RODGERSON 

East Weymouth — Printing Bobo 
Exhibition 2; Lunch Room Duty 1. 
Good statesmanship: a quality proved by many, but 
held by fezv. 



THELMA RUMBLE 

Weymouth Landing — College Course Thel 
A smile and a good word for all. 

L. SHERMAN RUSHTON 

East Weymouth — Carpentry 

Choir 2; Spring Concert 2; Wrestling 1, 2, 3: 
Lunch Room Duty 3; Graduation Clothing 4. 
A little -vork, a little play. 
Give him pleasure every day. 



Page Fifty c \&-' 



BARBARA RUXTON 

Weymouth Landing College Course A'jo /. v 

Ildiicirs 3; Home Room Messenger z\ Class 

Banquet 4. 

She is always bright and merry. 

IRENE RYAN 

South Weymouth — Business Course Rente, Shorty 
Advertising Club 4. 

True as the echo to the sound. 



EDNA SARGENT 

Suulh Weymouth — Business Course lide 
Weymouth Highlights 2; Glee Club 1; Junior 
Party 3; Senior Party 4; Home Room Messenger 
4; Advertising Club 4; Class Outing 4. 

Happy-go-lucky from morning till night. 

DOROTHY SARNO 

North Weymouth — General Course Dot, Dotty 

Choir 1, 2; Softball c. 

Laughter reigns supreme. 



SHIRLEY SAVOLA 

Weymouth Landing — College Course Shirl 
Junior Red Cross 2; Junior Decorating 3; Nominat- 
ing Committee 4; Senior Prom 4; Book Club 4; 
Teen Age Book Club 4; Library Assistant 2, 3, 4; 
French Club 4; Reflcetor Staff 4; Honors 1, 2, 3; 
L'sher at Senior Play 4; D. A. R. Scholarship 4. 
True to her word, her work, and her friends. 

LILLIAN SCARPELLI 

East Weymouth — Business Course Lit 
Weymouth Highlights 2; Gregg Transcription Cer- 
tificate for do words per minute 3; Secretary to 
Mr. Martin 4; Glee Club 1. 

Everyone can have a friend 

Who knows how to be a friend. 

PRISCILLA SCHLUSEMEYER 

South Weymouth — General Course Slucy 
Glee Club 1; Maroon and Gold Staff t, 2; Grammar 
School Messenger 1 ; Cheer Leader 2. 3, 4. Captain 
4; Assistant Student Council 3; Student Council 4; 
Athletic Dance 4; Class Banquet 4. 

On her and on her high endeavor 

The light of praise shall shine forever. 

ROBERT SCHULER 

North Weymouth — Agricultural Course Boh 
Football 3; Lunch Room Duty 2, 3. 4; Class 
Banquet 4. 

There's honesty, manhood, and good fellowship in 
thee. 



JOHN SERAFINI 

East Weymouth — Agricultural Course Jack 
Football 2; Wrestling 3, 4; Home Room Spelling 
Bee Champion 1 ; Graduation Clothing 4. 

A real good sport is he. 

As anyone can plainly see. 

ARTHUR SEWELL 

Hanover — General Course Art 
Football [, 2. 3; Wrestling 1. 2, 3; Track 2; 
U. S. Navy May, 1944 to July, 1946. 

Don't do today what you can do tomorrow. 



JOHN SHEEHY 

East Weymouth — College Course 

Wrestling 1; French Club 4; Ski Club 4; Class 
Prophecy 4; Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 4. 
A quiet, unassuming chap who will go far. 

PHILIP SHEPHERD 

South Weymouth — College Course Phil, Shcp 

Huntington School 1; Band 1; Weymouth High 
School 2, 3, 4; Track 2. 3, 4; Band 2. 3, 4; Orches- 
tra 2; Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 2; Choir 
3; Class History 4. 

When is the next bus to Rockland? 




c^Vj Page Fifty-one 




Page Fifty-two t \&-? 



SHIRLEY SHEPHERD 

South Weymouth — Home Economics B Course 
Baud i, 2, 3, 4; Gregg Transcription Certificate 
for 60 and 80 words per minute 3, 100 words per 
minute 4. 

An even and sweet disposition. 

LUCILLE SHEPPARD 

East Weymouth — Business Course / u, Lucy 

Gregg Transcription Certificate for 60 word-, per 
minute 3, 80 words 4. 

It's no matter what you do. 

If your heart be only true. 



PATRICIA SHERRK K 

Weymouth Landing — Business Course Pat, Patty 
Glee Club 1 ; Class Banquet 4. 

A faithful friend is the medicine of life. 

RICHARD SHERWOOD 

East Weymouth — College Course Dick 
Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Wrestling i, 2, 4; Junior 
Party 3; Senior Prom 4. 

He who invented work should hai'e finished it. 



LOUISE SIMONDS 

North Weymouth — Business Course Lu, Shorty 
Assistant Home Room Messenger i ; Jr. High 
Office 3; Spring Concert 3; Home Room Messenger 
3; Choir 3; Secretary to Mr. Lyons, Junior High 
Office 4 ; Advertising Club 4. 

A friend in need is a friend indeed. 

CATHERINE SMITH 

Weymouth Landing— College Course Cathy, Kitten 
Class History 4; French Club 4; Glee Club 1; 
Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 3. 

A happy disposition is a gift of nature. 



FRANKLIN SMITH, JR. 

North Weymouth — -General Course Smitty 
Junior Party 3; Senior Party 4; Camera Club 2, 3, 
4 ; Projection Club 2, 3, 4 ; Football Movies 
3, 4 ; Lunch Room Duty 3, 4 ; Assembly Lighting 
3, 4; Ski Club 4; Graduation Dance 4. 

Easy come, easy go. 

LEO SMITH 

Weymouth — Sheet Metal Smitty 

Exhibition 2. 3; Graduation Dance 3; Class Outing 
3 

The only way to have a friend is to be one. 

MICHAEL SMITH, JR. 

South Weymouth — College Course Mike 
Track i. z, 3; Honors 1; Public Sneaking 2, 4; 
Winner Region Oratorical Contest, County 4. 
A little wit will go a long way. 

WILLIAM SMITH 

South Weymouth — College Course Bill. Tuxa 

Band i, 2. 3. 4; Senior Party 4; Track 2, 3; 
Honors 3. 

Never worry; it doesn't pay. 
ALFRED SPENCE 

North Weymouth — College Course Al 
Wrestling 1; Nominating Committee 3; Student 
Council Assistant 3; Junior Party 3; Junior Outing 
3; Usher at Football Games 4; Honorary Naval 
Officer, Squantum Naval Air Station. Navy Day 
4; Ticket Collector at Concert 4; Senior Party 4; 
Class President 3, 4; Senior Play 4; Chemistry 
Laboratory Assistant 4; Honors 1. 2, 3. 

In all respects the best fellow in the world. 

LUCY STARRATT 

South Weymouth — Business Course Lu 
Home Room Messenger 1; Glee Club 1; Weymouth 
Highlights 2; Assistant Home Room Messenger 2; 
Gregg Transcription Certificate for 60 words per 
minute 3. 80 and 100 words per minute 4; Secre- 
tary to Miss Murphy 4. 

A never. changing smile, 

A never-tiring friend. 



BEVERLY STEARNS 

North Weymouth -Business Course Bev 
Class Will 4; Nominating Committee 3; Choir 2; 
Home Room Messenger 3 \ Lunch Room Duty 4; 
(iregg Transcription Certificate for 60 ami So words 
per minute 3, 100 words per minute 4; Secretary 
to Mr. Ghiorse 4; Class Outing 3; Honors 1. 
Her very frowns are fairer far 
Than those of other maidens are. 

WILLIAM STEPHENSON 

Weymouth — Sheet Metal Sieve 
Class President 3; Exhibition 2, 3; Student Coun- 
cil 3; Christmas Party 3; U. S. Navy 1943-1945. 
A good sport, a loyal friend, 
A worker on whom you ean defend. 



ROBERT KEITH 

Weymouth — College Course B >b 

Class Will 4; Graduation Clothing 4. 

A good-natured man is he. 

LILLIAN STONE 

Weymouth Landing — General Course Lit 
Class History 4; Gregg Transcription Certificate 
for 60 words per minute 3; Usher at Senior Play 4. 
She's not noisy, loud or gay. 
But enjoys life in a sweet, quiet way. 



JUANITA STUBBS 

Weymouth Landing — General Course Nita 
Brownville High School, Brownville, Me.; Outdoor 
Club 1 ; Glee Club 1 ; Weymouth High School 2, 
3, 4; Secretary to Miss Stockwell 4. 

Eyes of blue and a smile that's true. 

GERALD SULLIVAN 

East Weymouth — General Course Suily 
Football 2, 3. 4; Baseball 1, 2, 4; Basketball 2, 3, 
4; Lunch Room Duty 4; Graduation Dance 4. 
As fine a friend as he is an athlete. 



DONALD SWAN 

Weymouth Heights — College Course Don 
Class Prophecy 4; Football Manager 2, 3, 4; 
Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 1; Cross Country 
2, 3. 4; Track 2. 3; Laboratory Assistant 3, 4. 
Everybody's friend, nobody's enemy. 

OILMAN SYLVESTER 

East Weymouth — College Course Gil 
Band 3, 4; Orchestra 4. 

All tongues speak well of him. 



DOROTHY SYMPSON 

East Weymouth — Home Economics Course Dolly 
Junior Decorating 3; Graduation Clothing 4. 
There are some silent people who are more interest- 
ing than the best talkers. 

MARGARET TANGUY 

North Weymouth — Business Course Marge 
Junior Decorating 3; Junior Party 3; Home Room 
Messenger 2; Senior Party 4; Choir 1. 2; Gradua- 
tion Dance 4. 

Her smile is winning; her personality enchants. 



BARBARA TAYLOR 

North Weymouth — Business Course Barb 
Gregg Transcription Certificate for 60 words per 
minute 3. 

Why work when play is more fun? 

RICHARD THAYER 

Weymouth Landing — College Course Dick 
Band 1, 2, 3. 4; Orchestra 4; Spring Concert 2, 
3, 4; Winter Concert 1. 2. 3, 4; Class Banquet 4. 
The only way to have a friend is to be one. 




c^V> Page Fifty-three 




DORIS THERIAULT 

East Weymouth — College Course Terry 
Class Will 4; Junior Party Entertainment 3; Horn" 
Room Spelling Bee Champion 3; French Club 4; 

Honors 1. 

Be content to seem what you really are. 

KARIN THORNBERG 

East Weymouth — Business Course Connie 
Class Prophecy 4; Book Chili 4; Ski Club 4; 
Reflector Staff 2, 3. 4; High Honors 1, 2, 3; Gregg 
Transcription Certificate for 60, 80, 100 and 120 
words per minute 4; Secretary to Mr. Nelson 4; 
Head Cashier 2, 3. 

A good sport, a loyal friend, 

A worker on whom you can depend. 



WILLIAM THURSTON 

East Weymouth — Auto Repair Bill 
Truth is mighty and it -will prevail. 

EDWARD TIERNEY 

North Weymouth — Genearl Course Ed 
Band 1, 2. 3, 4; Orchestra 2, 3, 4: Winter Concert 
2, 3, 4; Spring Concert 2, 3, 4; Cross Country 1; 
Class Banquet 4. 

He has an infinite deal of wit. 



JOHN TIRRELL 

East Weymouth — Printing Johnny 
Exhibition 2; Lunch Room Duty 3. 

A man of cheerful yesterdays and confident 
tomorrows. 

HELEN TOWER 

East Weymouth — College Course 

Reflector Staff 4 ; Junior Decorating 3 ; Home 

Room Messenger 2; Senior Prom 4. 

Pep, personality, and wit, 
Bach of these exactly fit. 



STANLEY TRIBOU 

North Weymouth — Sheet Metal Stan 
Exhibition 2. 3. 

We recognize a good worker by his good work. 

CHARLES TUCCI 

East Weymouth — Auto Repair Charlie 
Wrestling i ; Exhibition 2, 3. 

All (joes well with him. 



GERALD TWOMEY 

South Weymouth — Agricultural Course Jerry 
Silence makes the mind grow wiser. 

OLGA VALDES 

North Weymouth— Business Course Shorty 
Who's Who 4; Choir 1; Gregg Transcription Certi- 
cate for 60 and 80 words per minute 3. 100 words 
per minute 4; Junior High Office 4. 

Winning each heart and delighting each eye. 



WINIFRED WALLING 

North Weymouth — Husiness Course Winnie 
Choir 2 ; Candy (iirl at Footbal (iames 3. 
A comrade blithe and full of glee. 
Who dares to laugh out, loud and free. 

RALPH WALO 

South Weymouth — Husiness Course Ralph, Baldy 
Projection Club 3. 4; Reflector Staff 4; Senior 
Play 4; Track 4; Home Room Messenger 1. 2; 
Messenger for 107; Advertising Club 4; Honors 1. 
Graduation Dance 4. 

Humor seasoned with wit. 



Page Fifty'four c \a-' 



ELEANOR WALSH 

Weymouth Landing Business Course hlly, L 

Lunch Room Duty i, - < 3: Choir 1; Usher at 
Winter Concert 4; Advertising Club 4- 

Forever smiling, always on the go. 

MELVIN WALSH 

South Weymouth College Course Mel 
Class Prophecy 4; Nominating Committee 3; Band 

1, 3; Christmas Flay 3: Usher at Graduation 3; 
Baseball 1, 3; Basketball 2, 3. 4; Cross Country 

2. 4; Honors 1, 2, 3. ... 
Little in site, friendly and laughing in spirit. 



ROBERT WARREN 

Weymouth Landing College Course Hop 
Who's Who 4; Projection Club 3; Football 1, 2, 3, 
4; Track 3; Wrestling 2; Honors 1, 2, 3; Boys' 
State Meet 3; Oscar Horton Trophy 4. 

The finest sport in everything he does. 

PATRICIA WEEKS 

Weymouth Landing— College Course Patty 
Library Assistant 2; Active Junior Red Cross 2; 
Band 2. 3. 4; Choir 2. 3. 4; Spring Concert 2, 3, 
4; Winter Concert 3. 4; Class History 4; Athletic 
Dance Decorating Committee 4; High Honors 1, 2, 

3- ,. 

Capable and a winning personality. 

FRANCIS WE1DMAN 

Weymouth Landing — Business Course 

Franny, Red. Weedy 
A companion that is cheerful is worth more than 
gold. 

ROSE WHEELER 

East Weymouth — General Course Ginger 
Choir 1; Lunch Room Duty 2, 3. 4; I'sher at 
Concert 4; Advertising Club 4; Class Outing 4. 
She is merry and nay, 
And enjoys life each day. 

MADISON WHITTIER 

East Weymouth — College Course Mac 
Newton High School 2, 3; Aviation Club 2; Orange 
Shield 2 ; Home Room Manager 2 ; Weymouth 
High School 4. 

A good sport, a good friend. 

PARKER WHITTLE 

Weymouth Landing — College Course C. P. Ill 
Nominating Committee 4; Senior Prom 4; Ticket 
Collector at Concert 4; Cross Country 4; Track 3. 
4; Football 2; Honors 1; Senior Play Ticket 
Collector 4. 

A good worker, a better sport, and a very good 
friend. 

PATRICIA WILLIAMS 

South Weymouth — College Course Pat, Patty 

Class Prophecy 4; Junior Party 3; Athletic Dance 
Decorating Committee 4; Book Club 4; French 
Club 4; Ski Club 4; Reflector Staff 4: Honors 1; 
High Honors 2. 3; Home Room Messenger 4; 
Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 1 ; Honorary- 
Member of the Old Colony Club 4. 
It's nice to be natural when you're naturally nice. 

PHYLIS WILLIAMS 

North Weymouth — Business Course Phyl 
Who's Who 4 ; Nominating Committee 3, 4 ; Choir 
1; Home Room Messenger 3; Gregg Transcription 
Certificate for 60 and 80 words 3, 100 and 120 
words 4; Secretary to Mr. Gutterson 3, 4; High 
Honors 1, 2, 3. 

Although she looks qentle and shy. 
There's a twinkle of mischief in her eye. 

GERALDINE WOLFE 

North Weymouth — Business Course Gerry 
Home Room Messenger t; Junior Party 3; Junijr 
Decorating 3; Junior Outing 3; Assistant Student 
Council 3; Gregg Transcription Certificate for 
do words per minute 3; Advertising Club 4; Grad- 
uation Clothing 4. 

A laughing eye. a merry smile. 

Will always make a girl worth while. 

JOSEPH WOLFERT 

East Weymouth — Printing Joe 
Wrestling 1; Choir 2; Exhibition 2. 3; Nominating 
Committee 3; Lunch Room Duty 3. 

Quiet? Look again! 









PS 

I 

1 V 


1 


B '' ' M^"**Sk 




" ~m Jm 






* ( i 







c^Sl, Page Fifty'five 




ARLENE WOOD 

East Weymouth — Business Course 

Softball i, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 3; Volleyball 3; 

4 H Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Camera Club 3. 

Quietness is in itself a virtue. 

GEORGE WOOD 

East Weymouth — Business Course " nody 

Advertising Club 4; Graduation Clothing 4- 
He that hath knowledge spareth words. 



MAHLON WOOD 

East Weymouth — Auto Repair 

Nominating Committee 3; U. S. Army 1943-1946. 
A word is enough for a wise man. 

MURIEL WOODWORTH 

North Weymouth — General Course 

Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 2; Lunch 

Room Duty 4. 

A real good sport is she. 

As anyone' can plainly see. 



EDMUND WRIGHT, JR. 

East Weymouth — General Course 
Band 4. 

The finest sport in everything he does. 



Ed 



NELLIE WYSOCKI 

North Weymouth — Home Economics A Course 

Nellie 

Junior Decorating 3; Home Room Messenger 3; 
Class Outing 4. 

Variety is the spice of life. 



DONALD H. MILLER 

East Weymouth — Sheet Metal 
U. S. Army 1945-1947. 

A good pal is long remembered. 



Don 



Page Fifty-six r \&^ 



A Better World 
through 

LITERATURE 

By ANTHONY DANIELE 




Jl N order to perpetuate peace, there is a drastic need of deeper understanding and 
friendly relationship among the peoples of the world. What greater aid is there for 
creating such harmony than the benefits derived from culture? Without doubt, a 
better world would result from the acknowledgement of the value of literature, music, 
and art. 

Literature, the written reflection of great men, has had much influence upon the lives 
of all. Thus it is most necessary that it embody material that is wholesome, meaningful, 
entertaining, and educational. Milton once said, "For books are as meats and viands 
are; some of good, some of evil substance." 

Today we live in a world teeming with literary works ; yet only a small percentage 
of these will stand the test of time, as have those of Shakespeare and Dickens. These 
two wrote to amuse, to entertain ordinary people ; yet the average person is really 
afraid to try to read these truly great writers. They think that such writers have no 
place in their lives. Inwardly, the real reason is a fear of not understanding or that 
too much effort will be entailed. 

It should be realized that a well-chosen story is an incessant challenge to a person's 
conception of life. It broadens a narrow life, increases a person's thinking, cultivates 
one's taste, and creates a literary appreciation. Through reading, people overcome 
prejudices by broadening their minds to understand the plights of others. Reading 
might be as essential a part of a man's life as eating or sleeping. Literature reveals 
to us the cares, aspirations, joys, sorrows, and dreams of human beings, so that we 
are enabled to sympathize with others. There are kinds of literature to suit every 
taste from the intelligent mystery to gentle humor. 

"Books are friends" is an expression we often hear. But do we ever hear the 
opposite? Some novels today, however, are examples of book enemies; they are of no 
value and satisfy only those who do not care to elevate their minds. Many read the 
works of true geniuses such as Dickens, Shakespeare, Thackeray, and Scott only when 
they are forced. Whatever type of literature desired can be found among the masters 
of the literary field. If one wants a story with an American history background, what 
books depict early American life better than Kenneth Roberts's "Northwest Passage" 
and "Arundel"? Whoever prefers war stories should try "Thirty Seconds over 
Tokyo" or "God Is My Co-Pilot." Social reform has yet to be more cleverly character- 
ized than it was in Victor Hugo's "Les Miserables", the novel about a social outcast, 
Jean Valjean. Even though most novels contain the love element, those who enjoy the 
so-called "love story" can find one of the highest type in "Romeo and Juliet", two 
names to this day synonymous with true love and sacrifice. Few ordinary people have 
ever heard of the Greek writer and philosopher, Plato, who, strange as it seems, wrote 
for everyone, young and old, learned and unlearned. Chaucer, renowned mediaeval 



Page Fifty-eight C \2±J 



poet, wrote about simple people for all people. If one wants a story of the struggles of 
the poor, one should turn to the life of Abraham Lincoln, who rose from a humble 
back-woodsman to the exalted position of President of the United Sates. There are 
countless worthwhile books for professional men, office workers, skilled laborers, and 
unskilled laborers. They need only to be hunted out. True, a fraction of literary value 
can be obtained from modern writers. Although much of modern literature is on a 
decidedly low scale, some of the more scrupulous writers have realized their tasks and 
have produced excellent material. What literature is more widely distributed than 
newspapers and periodicals? Many magazines, really worthless, are printed daily. 
Think of the thousands that are affected by these! The only one to remedy this situa- 
tion is the conscientious reader who carefully discriminates publications. 

Literature is a documentary of life. To understand human nature, to know your 
fellow being, to see in him his admirable points can be steps forward in a better way 
of living. Today literature is held in low esteem by many. In fact, it has been noted that 
in some high schools Shakespeare and Scott have been substituted by best-sellers. 
What competition literature has with the radio and movies which need little or no 
concentration ! This fact is a reason why people should read more. They cannot see 
in the movies or hear over the radio what they want at a given moment, but in books 
they can enjoy a different subject at any time. 

Reading is a means of extending our experiences geographically; we can travel to 
any corner of the world from darkest Africa to the snowy regions of the Yukon. 
Most unusual experiences can be gained by trekking westward to Oregon in Emerson 
Hough's "The Covered Wagon" or by flying with Anne Lindbergh's "North to the 
Orient." 

We can extend our experiences historically by spending "A Day in Old Athens" 
with William Stearns Davis or by partaking of the struggles of early American 
pioneers in the book, "Giants of the Earth." Reading carries us back years, centuries, 
generations, and projects us ahead to the future. 

Through books our experiences can be extended socially. How else can we more 
clearly understand social problems than by reading about them? Charles Dickens, one 
of the foremost novelists of all times, influenced a change of social conditions in 
England through his "Oliver Twist" and other novels. 

Literature can extend our experiences intellectually; we read to learn. Today when 
specialization in every field is steadily advancing, the intellectual capacity of all must 
be increased. Standards of education are rising and it will be unfortunate for the 
person who doesn't develop his intellectual abilities. 

Reading can extend our experiences emotionally. In reading substantial material, 
we can find solutions to our emotional problems. It does not seem possible that a person 
can overcome an emotional crisis in his life by reading. However, it is true. To illus- 
trate: the juvenile editor of "Scribner's" once made this statement, "When I was of an 
early age, my father died ; I was broken-hearted. By reading a book telling how a girl 
of the same age as I came through, when both her parents died, I, inspired, overcame 
my grief." This quotation proves how helpful a book can be in time of an emotional 
setback. 

Lastly literature can expand our experiences morally. Where else are moral virtues 
better exemplified than in such works as Tennyson's "Idylls of the King," Booker T. 
Washington's "Up from Slavery", or Lowell's "Vision of Sir Launfal"? 

Literature is inescapably moral, and reading and studying it have a moral effect. 
Whether the effect is good or bad depends upon the reader. No one can read a book 
without gaining some moral significance from it. Every day that we read the news- 
papers, we get either favorable or unfavorable information. Whenever we read a 
magazine, we get decided ideas from its various articles. Thus we should strive to 
read whatever will help us to face all problems, whether they are social, emotional, or 
moral, in order to bring about a better world, a world free from the nihilistic doctrines 
of communism, anarchy, and immorality. 

c^SV. Page Fifty-nine 



A Better World 
through 

MUSIC 

By SALLY MATHEWS 




E man who hath not music in himself, nor is not moved with concord of sweet 
sound, is fit for treason, stratagems, and spoils." Shakespeare 

We are all familiar with music in its broader function — that of relaxation and 
recreation — but music has other and equally important functions bearing on everyday 
life which merit wider recognition. 

Music has a definite influence on character. Everyone realizes its power over human 
emotions. It is, perhaps, a little more difficult to picture the effect on character, but 
the one would naturally follow the other, since character is, to a large extent, a product 
of the emotions. 

Membership in a music group, while providing contacts, satisfies a natural desire. 
Aside from this, a great deal of the routine of musical group work is excellent training. 
One cannot succeed in any such organization unless he is physically and mentally alert. 
Playing an instrument calls for complete co-ordination of eye, ear, hand, and head, thus 
teaching concentration of the finest type. Participation in such a group teaches the im- 
portance of teamwork. A person learns to realize that, although he alone does not 
comprise the whole group, his absence will destroy the balance of instruments or 
voices, thus spoiling the desired effect. The lessons of routine, alertness, co-ordination, 
concentration, punctuality, co-operation, and the importance of the individual as an 
integral part of the group which are learned in such organizations, will be invaluable 
throughout life. 

There is no doubt that music is a social asset. A person who can sing or play an 
instrument is bound to be a welcomed member at parties and social gatherings ; he 
never lacks for company. Moreover, one who is thus the centre of a group assumes a 
certain responsibility in his anxiety to please, thus becoming a sort of leader. 

The arguments for music as a character-building influence are strong, and yet the 
present scheme of general education often fails to accord music its rightful place of 
importance. 

Music hath charms to soothe the savage breast. It also can pacify the savage in the 
civilized breast. Even as David dispelled Saul's evil moods, and refreshed him by 
playing the harp, so today music is an important factor in social problems and crime 
prevention. Statistics show that of 30,000 children enrolled in the Music School 
Settlement in the heart of New York's East Side, not one student in twenty-five years 
had ever been brought before a Juvenile Court for delinquency. Now, eighteen years 
later, this marvelous record still stands. Furthermore, reports from penal institutions 



Page Sixty *\S^? 



show that musicians and musically educated persons rarely commit crimes. Music- 
induces moods and states of mind that are incompatible with crime. Plato said, "Music 
is a moral law. It is the essence of order and leads to all that is good, just, and 
beautiful." 

As far back as primitive times, when man began to sing or beat out rhythm on 
drums, music became a serious and essential thing in life. It became a part of his 
work and has continued so throughout the world among people who engage in handi- 
crafts and in mass labor. Work songs, such as the "Volga Boatman" and hundreds of 
others, have relieved monotony and stimulated workers, even under cruel and oppressive 
conditions. The advent of the phonograph and the radio put music into millions of 
homes and increased interest in this art. About twenty years ago, a group of men came 
to realize that there was an entirely new and different field for music. Experiments 
showed that by relieving the monotony of mechanical operations by music, the efficiency 
of workers was increased, error decreased, nervous tension and fatigue were lessened, 
workers were happier and more co-operative, and their morale was noticeably raised. 
Thus, functional music, a planned music service, is revolutionizing conditions in 
offices, factories, and public places. 

A great many scientists and physicians believe that music has healing power. Science 
is on the threshold of many important discoveries regarding its healing possibilities. 

From ancient times to the present, some degree of the influence of music is traceable 
in national and international movements. Through the ages music has excited martial 
enthusiasm. Minstrels and monks of ancient times encouraged peoples to defend their 
lands. Luther used music to a large extent to bring about the Reformation. It was said 
of him that in his hands the soul and mind of the German people were as a lyre in 
the hands of the artist. 

The songs which became popular during World Wars I and II furnish evidence 
of the impetus music gives to troops which, in many instances, spells victory. That it 
was the influence of the music and not the words is illustrated by the following story 
told by Conan Doyle. "Singing lustily from start to finish of a battle, Russian soldiers 
won a position. A spectator inquiring what were the words that so inspired the 
Russians was told they were 'Ivan's in the garden picking cabbages,' repeated over and 
over again." There is no doubt that a tune and the instruments which bring it to the 
public exert a potent influence be it in religion, in social matters, or in national or in- 
ternational politics. 

Just as music has influenced history in the past, so will it exert its influence today and 
in the future. Music is international. There is no better way to understand a foreign 
people than to study the music. As people sing and play each other's music, they grow 
to understand each other better ; and people working, singing, playing together are not 
likely to turn their thoughts to fighting. At no time has music been more needed than 
now to bring about understanding and harmony and thus prevent war, the arch crime 
of nations. 

Music is pure poetry expressed through tone instead of words. Poetry in a foreign 
tongue might be entirely meaningless to us, whereas music of foreign lands can be 
understood and appreciated by all. Music is the universal language. As Herbert 
Spencer, who was a great believer in the power of music in the world, once remarked, 
"Music must take rank as the finest of the fine arts — as the one which, more than 
any other, ministers to human welfare." 



c"^5l» Page Sixty'one 




A Better World 



By PATRICIA WEEKS 



THROUGH 



ART 




-Hhe idea that art exists only within the frames in museums and galleries is as 
Victorian as horse-hair furniture." Art today is an important phase of everyday life; it 
affects the lives of men, women, and children in modern times more than it did in the 
days when confined within the galleries. It has always been important in respect to the 
fine arts, but in modern times many more practical uses are being found ; for example, 
there is the increasing realization of its place in education, its aesthetic value, the 
growing field in industry, and the active part which art principles play in our everyday 
lives. Since Pearl Harbor, art has played a dramatic role in the rehabilitation of our 
wounded, emotionally and physically. Thus, it is not a means of expression limited to 
the gifted, nor a subject to be isolated in museums and galleries. 

When art was first introduced into the schools, it had a relatively unimportant 
place, with little stress upon its educational value. Owing to stepped-up civilization, 
noted educators are becoming more conscious that students need the creative ex- 
pression afforded by art to offset the rest of the curriculum in the development of a 
rounded personality. Furthermore, they have discovered that visual means is the most 
effective method of learning in any field. Thus art in education has two sides; it 
facilitates the learning process and it develops personality. 

Equally important to the educational value is the aesthetic which tends to develop 
inner-satisfaction, appreciation, and self-expression. Art is not placed in the schools to 
encourage pupils to become masters, but to encourage the pupil to use his own creative 
ability and to discover things for himself. Students know the personal satisfaction 
that can be derived from something of their own creation, bringing relaxation from 
specialized academic subjects and rounding out personality, which, in turn, regulates 
behavior. 

The importance of art in affecting personalities can be shown by the amount given 
soldiers for emotional and physical rehabilitation. An excellent example of the latter 
occurred at the Gushing General Hospital in Framingham. A middle-aged soldier had 
come through one of the worst battles of the war with a mental disorder. Doctors 
were so worried that, after much thought, they suggested that some form of art work 
might help him. Being unskilled in art, the soldier didn't know what to do with the 
pencils and paper given him. When he was told to draw anything that came into 
his mind, he began drawing two hills, one a little larger than the other. He worked 
over his drawing for many hours; and, when his doctors came to see him, he exolained 
it as follows. He had partially covered the two hills with rocks, trees, and projections 
of all kinds. On the upward slope of the larger hill, the projections symbolized his 
military life, starting with his early training and climaxing, at the summit of the hill, 

Page Sixty-two C \^J 



with the hattle which had placed him in his present condition. Symbolically, he was 
drawing the events of his own life. The obstructions on the other side of the hill 
symbolized the events which occurred after his mental collapse, the valley between 
the two hills representing the lowest point of his mental condition. At the time of 
this report he was three-quarters of the way up the smaller hill, showing a normal in- 
terest in things about him. The doctors were enthusiastic about his work, stating that 
the self-expression illustrated in his drawing was becoming an incentive to the patient 
to climb to the top of the second hill and back to mental health. 

This is only one of the many cases which have benefited from art therapy. Art in 
the form of crafts, such as weaving and carpentry, provides exercise for damaged tissue 
and muscles. The fact that this exercise is in the form of something creative is an 
incentive to keep the patient at his work. 

In the industrial field, the artist no longer concerns himself merely with painting 
and sculpturing, but he turns his talents to the production of such practical articles as 
home fixtures and the new field of plastics. Almost all industries rely upon art in some 
way, whether it be in their advertising or design. 

Art is also an important factor in everyday life. What dreary places homes would 
be if it were not for those artistic persons who set the modes for decorations! Many 
great inventions have emerged from the drawing boards of persons with creative 
ability. Decorations in homes, landscaping of gardens, and personal appearances all rely 
upon art principles. Color, feeling for fabrics, design of homes, and style of furniture ; 
all these greatly enhance an individual's outlook on the world. A person's interest in 
everything about him will be quickened if he becomes interested in some creative ex- 
pression, whether it be revarnishing of an old table, or just dabbing about with water 
colors. His sense of observation will become more acute and he will begin to see beauty 
in everything from the paintings of the masters down to an old umbrella stand. He 
will become aware also of the discordant things about him, of ill-proportioned spacing 
or clashing colors in his surroundings, tending to encourage him to improve his home 
and community. 

As Kenyon Cox once said, "Work thou for pleasure, sing or paint or carve the 
thing thou lovest, though the body starve. Who works for glory misses oft the goal ; 
Who works for money coins his very soul. Work for the work's sake, then, and it may 
be that things shall be added unto thee." 

Today we hope we have suggested ways in which your lives might be broadened by 
including within them some phases of literature, music, or art. These three have too 
often been overlooked, whether the neglect comes from the fear of trying something 
new, or of becoming so involved that enjoyment will be lessened. These are mere ex- 
cuses, for the small amount of work entailed will bring a great amount of pleasure. 
We are convinced that yours can be a fuller life if you will cultivate one of these 
closely allied subjects, literature, music, or art. 



c^!V» Page Sixty-three 




Bill Mcintosh. Jim Dalv, Fred 

Loud, Bill Brady 

Faith Turner, Betty Connolly, 

Helena LeVangie, Bertha La 

Montagne, Helen Tower 

Frank Smith, Fred Loud, Jim 

Daly; Second Row: Bill Rennie, 

Joanne McKinnon; Third Row: 

John Baumeister, Bill Brady, 

Winifred Caldwell 

Lorraine Kendall, Lillian Scar- 

pelli 

Paul Wheeler, Helena LeVangie; 
Second Row : Jean Bentley, 
Bertha LaMontagne; Third Row: 
George O'Neil, Roald Heitmann, 



George McCue 

Marion Doyle. Lois Gould 

Miss Jones, Miss Reidy, Miss 

Fay 

Barbara Keefe 
Warren Porter 
Audrey McKenna 
Peggy Knox 

Mike LaRocco, Bob Warren, 
George Bicknell 
Bob Warren 

Madeline Paone, Louise Sim- 
onds; Second Row: Fay Maddy, 
Carolyn Dewey, Phyllis Pingree 
Barbara and Loraine Condrick 
Rose Bianco, Doris Griggs 



Helen Tower. Lorraine Condrick, 
Barbara Ruxton; Back Row: 
Barbara Condrick. Meredith Hol- 
brook, Lois Gould 
Bert Doble, John Gallian, John 
Baumeister 
Barbara Dwyer 

Muriel Woodworth, Beverly 
Stearns. Evelyn Forest 

21. Pete Johnson 

22. Eileen Kezer 

23. Nancy Dorn 

24. Polly Jordan 

25. Nancy Brda 

26. Rex Fenderson, Fred Loud 

27. Sally Mathews, Parker Whittle 



17- 



18. 



19. 



First Row (left to right) : A. Curtin, Mr. Steele, C. Bergfors, W. LeVangie. B. Jordan, D. Almquist, Miss 
White. Mr. Brown, M. Dwyer; Second Row: J. Colarusso, H. Stenherg. B. Chellis, A. Desmond, B. Hamilton, 
P. Donovan, D. Donaldson, J. Freeman, V. Horsch; Third Row: A. Leslie. P. Williams, J. Bentley, B. Ferreira, 
V. Gauley, T. Papergeorge. J. Barker, K. Weeks. S. Savola; Fourth Row: C. Hanson. E. Kezer, H. Tower. 
L. Gould, M. Doyle, A. Sheehan, H. LeVangie, B. LaMontagne, D. Chellis; Fifth Row: R. Walo, E. MacDougal, 
P. Densmore, C. Stone, K. Thornberg, N. Ames, E. Rogers. 



Jl he Staff of the Reflector has just finished another successful year during which 
there have been three regular issues and the Year Book. For the first time it was 
necessary to have certain parts of the Year Book printed outside the Weymouth 
Vocational School. 

By choosing the material of most worth from all the classes we have endeav- 
ored to make our school paper one of the best. We hope our efforts have not been 
in vain and that the students have found the Reflector of interest. 

We of the Reflector wish to thank our faculty advisers, Mr. Prescott B. 
Brown, Miss Alice White, and Mr. James F. Steele, for the splendid and untiring 
service and advice they have given us. We wish to thank also the teachers for their 
assistance, and are grateful to Mr. Harry F. Duncan for his co-operation in print- 
ing the Reflector. 

We wish to extend our wishes to next year's staff. May they have as great a 
year as has the staff of 1946—1947. 



Page Sixty'six *\&-? 



REFLECTOR 







First Row (left to right): M. Perrow. R. O'Neil, J. Walsh, J. Freeman, A. Curtin; Second Row: B. Grounds, 
R. McCarthy, B. Messier, J. McMerriman, L. Nvberg, J. Nash, P. Schlusemeyer, J. Chase, H. Cassiani; Third 
Row: R. Rosa, J. McCarthy, E. DeLuca, D. Almquist, S. Smith, R. Bresnahan. 

STUDENT COUNCIL 

The Student Council, in this past year, was enlarged to seven members from each 
of the three upper classes. Before this, the number has been five from each class. 
This change was made so that the Council could sponsor more affairs. As usual, 
the Athletic Dance was held in December, and another dance is planned for 
October of the coming year. The senior members of the Council took part in a 
program at Plymouth High School where a convention of all Student Council 
bodies of southeastern Massachusetts was held. There was also a spring convention 
at Rockland. With a new year coming, we hope that the Council will be able to 
perform as effectively in the future as it has in the past. 

Officers for ip^6—ip^y 
President, James McCarthy 
Vice President, Don Almquist 
Secretary, Jean Walsh 
Seniors 

Don Almquist Joanne McMerriman 

Helen Casciani Barbara Messier 

Priscilla Schlusemeyer James McCarthy 
Jean Nash 

Juniors 

Rita O'Neil Steward Smith 

Jean Walsh Lillian Nyberg 

Richard Rosa Barbara Grounds 

Sophomores 
Ann Curtin Robert McCarthy 

Joan Freeman Edward De Luca 

James Chase Marjorie Perrow 

Robert Bresnahan 



c^V. Page Sixty-seven 



First Row (left to right): G. Dunn, K. Weeks, N. Cain, E. Ewing, R. Pullo, J. Shea, J. Shaw, C. Currier, 
J. Dickson, H. McGlynn, N. Shaw, W. Allison. S. Mathews, C. Stone, R. Marr, R. Lewis. R. Coletti, B. 
Bussiere, R. Peterson, E. Kezer, Bandleader, Russell Jack. Second Row: B. Jordan, L. Simmonds. E. Tierney, 
S. Lynch, R. Madden, T. Knowles. R. Doherty, J. Rathgeh. R. Leites, 11. Alden, J. Cosgrove, A. DelBosco, 
C. Thompson, J. Austin, C. Palmer, P. Weeks. F. Butler, D. Resnick, W. Thayer. R. Cass. M. Paone. A. Greene. 
Third Row: P. Pingree, M. Paone, W. Mills, A. Fitts, R. Thayer, M. Pearson, II. Siroonian, D. Hull, L. 
Desmond, G. Sylvester, H. Speck, I. Walling. N. dimming, R. Rosa, P. Spallino, D. Ferguson, P. Berry, A. 
Cavanaugh, Marching Instructor, Francis Kelly. Fourth Row: A. Clow. W. Smith. T. Boraks, E. Acorn, J. 
Delahunt, H. Bates, J. Kilburne, G. Rogers, J. Nevins, E. Wright, L. Southworth, R. Fitts, A. Emberly, B. 
Robbins, C. Stebbins, P. Shepherd. 



T 



BAND 



he past year has been a busy and successful one for the Weymouth High Band 
under its capable director, Mr. Jack. 

The group, besides playing at assemblies, attended all the football games and 
delighted the spectators with snappy maneuvers, greatly enhanced by the colorful 
effect of the new uniforms. The band also participated in the annual Winter and 
Spring Concerts and took part in a special concert on March 14, when they played 
host to the A Capella Choir from Keene, New Hampshire. 



Clarinets 
Joan Austin 
Robert Bowes 
Beverly Bussiere 
Francis Butler 
Ralph Coletti 
William Jackson 
Richard Lewis 
Robert Marr 
Charleen Palmer 
Roy Peterson 
Harold Porter 
Ralph Pullo 
David Resnick 
John Shaw 
Norman Shaw 
John Shea 
Clayton Stone 
Barbara Walsh 
Patricia Weeks 

Oboes 

Richard Summers 
William Thayer 

Saxophones 

Natalie dimming 
Donald Ferguson 
Lauren Osgood 
Bradford Robbins 
Philip Shepherd 

Alto Horn 
Arthur Fitts 



Cornets 

Elaine Acorn 
Robert Alden 
Henry Bates 
Franklin Boraks 
Leo Boyle 
Allan Brown 
John Cosgrove 
John Delahunt 
Robert Doherty 
Herbert Fairfield 
Jerome Kilburne 
Theodore Knowles 
Robert Leites 
Richard Madden 
Marjorie Pearson 
Janice Rathgeb 
William Smith 
Herbert Taylor 
Richard Thayer 

Flutes 

William Alison 
Clifford Currier 
Janet Dixon 
Sally Mathews 
Helen McGlynn 

Baritone Horns 
Philip Berry 
Arthur Emberly 

Bass Horn 

William Mills 



Trombones 
Roy Cass 
Earl Ewing 
Shirley Lynch 
Robert Rosa 
Philip Spallino 
Harvey Speck 
Shirley Southworth 
Charles Stebbins 
Charles Sundin 
Edward Tierney 
Drums 

Leo Desmond 
Donald Hull 
Barkov Siroonian 
Irving Walling 
Edmund Wright 
Glockenspiel 

Carolyn Thompson 
Bass Drum 

Anthony DelBosco 
Tim pani 

Elliot Rogers 
French Horns 
Albert Clow 
Robert Fitts 
Band Manager 

George Dunn 
Librarians 
Nancy Cain 
Katherine Weeks 



Page Sixty-eight 



First Row (left to right): B. Brown, N. Cumming, N. Norwood, P. Chandler, J. Callahan. E. Wardwell. R. 
Benedict, M. Pearson; Second Row: N. Cain, J. Potts, S. Lynch, K. Weeks, C. Palmer, P. Weeks, S. Mathews, 
J. Thompson, M. Nyberg; Third Row: J. Cosgrove, J. Sundin. I. Bloom, L. Egon, G. Rogers, A. DelBosco, W. 
Thayer, C. Currier. F. Butler, F. Payne. C. Fitts, C. Bergfors. W. Mills; Fourth Row: A. Clow, D. Cain, 
R. Summers, R. Fitts, W. Jackson, E. Tierney, R. Thayer, W. Alison, L. Osgood, J. Delahunt, T. Petze, G. 
Sylvester, P. Berry. 



ORCHESTRA 



T 



his year the orchestra has become increasingly popular outside the high school 
as may be seen by its performances for grammar school P. T. A.'s, the Teachers' 
Association, the Old Colony Club, and the De Molay Minstrel Show. Under the 
able and understanding director, Mr. Jack, the orchestra has presented programs 
including suites, waltzes, opera selections, marches, and light orchestral works. A 
notable improvement this year is the increase in the violin section. Several of the 
members attended the New England Music Festival in Brattleboro, Vermont, 
where they played in a one hundred piece orchestra composed of music students 
from all over New England. 

MEMBERS OF THE ORCHESTRA 
Clarinets 

Carl Bergfors 
Francis Butler 
W illiam Jackson 
Charleen Palmer 
Patricia Weeks 



Violins 
Ruth Benedict 
David Cain 
June Callahan 
Clifford Currier 
Lars Egon 
Arthur Fitts 
Robert Fitts 
William Mills 
Nancy Norwood 
Mildred Nyberg 
Francis Payne 
Joan Potts 
John Sundin 

Cello 

Elinor Wardwell 

Cornets 
John Cosgrove 
John Delahunt 
Marjorie Pearson 
Richard Thayer 



Saxophone 

Lauren Osgood 

Piano 

Ira Bloom 
Betsey Brown 
Pauline Chandler 
Joanna Thompson 

Librarians 
Nancy Cain 
Katherine Weeks 

Flutes 

William Alison 
Sally Mathews 



Baritone Horn 
Philip Berry 

Timpani 

Elliott Rogers 

French Horn 
Albert Clow 

'From bones 
Shirley Lynch 
Edward Tierney 

Oboes 

Richard Summers 
William Thayer 

Drums 

Donald Hull 
Thomas Petze 
Gilman Sylvester 

Bass Drum 

Anthony DelBosco 



c^SVi Page Sixty'nine 



First Row (left to right) : R. Nash, R. Judge, E. Barker, E. McKenzie, B. McKenzie, K, Mahoney, M. Pace, 
P. Chandler, P. Pitcher, J. Hayden; Second Row: V. Walsh, B. Smith, N. Cain. S. Mathews, G. MacLean, 
M. Mapes, J. Johnson, L. Courchene, R. Wilkie, A. Gillman, J. Hayden; Third Row: P. Farr, B. Townsend, 
E. Sullivan, L. Longchamps, P. Weeks, D. Chellis, T. Papageorge. J. Potts. D. Pirel. E. Nerger, T. Morash, 
M. Jewell; Fourth Row: J. Slayter, B. McKenzie, J. Thompson, C. Gill, L. Nyberg. C. Thompson, A. Campbell, 
M. Littlefield, J. Letourneau, E. Stern, P. Frye, J. MacGoldrick; Fifth Row: R. Colette, C. Currier, C. Fitts, 
W. Spencer, L. Osgood, E. Hannaford, R. Fitts, R. Summers, W. Mills, P. Berry. 



JL he Choir has successfully completed its third year under the capahle leadership 
Mr. Russell Jack. This past year they participated in the Spring and Winter 
Concerts and also gave a program for the Monday Club. 

Seven choir members, along with members of the band and orchestra, attend- 
ed the New England Music Festival in Brattleboro, Vermont. 

All those who attended the special concert in March were given a thrill to 
hear the Keene, N. H. High School A Capella Choir, who gave our choir members 
something to strive for in the future. 



Page Seventy r \&~> 



CHOIR 





First Row (left to right): R. Walo. N. Cain, A. McKenna, A. Spence, W. Mills; Second Row: Miss Flaherty, 
director, B. Jordan, S. Ouellet, S. Reidy, L. Simonds, S. Mathews; Third Row: G. Petze, L. Kendall, P. 
Estabrook, J. Cullivan, L. Boyle. 



SENIOR PLAY 



n the nights of February 14 and March 4 the Senior Class presented the three- 
act comedy, "A Date with Judy," adapted from the popular radio program of the 
same name, under the able direction of our new guidance teacher, Miss Edna 
Flaherty. 

The plot centres around Judy Foster, a vivacious sixteen-year-old, and her 
attempts to raise money for the Community Relief Fund Ball. Her father's win- 
ning the contest for the "most kissable lips," the reading of the "horrible 
confession" to the P. T. A. instead of Mrs. Foster's planned speech, and Mitzie's 
portrayal of a French divorcee to impress Mr. Martindale, a Broadway producer 
were only a few of the amusing situations which resulted. 



THE CAST 

Judy Foster 
Melvin Foster 
Dora Foster 
Randolph Foster 
Hannah 

Barbara Winsocket 
Oogie Pringle 
Mitzie Hoffman 
Mr. Martindale 
Mrs. Hotchkiss 
Eloise Hotchkiss 
Mrs. Schlutzhammer 
Rex O'Connor 
Susie O'Connor 



Audrey McKenna 
William Mills 
Nancy Cain 
Ralph Walo 
Lorraine Kendall 
Sally Mathews 
Alfred Spence 
Beverly Jordan 
Leo Boyle 
Jean Cullivan 
Shirley Ouellet 
Louise Simonds 
Paul Estabrook 
Shirley Reidy 



c^SVj Page Seventy'One 



First Row (left to right) : Mr. Arlanson, Coach, J. Coveney, Ronald Smith. R. Fenderson, J. Dalto, J. Duca. 
H. Boucher, J. Gallian, G. Sullivan, W. Porter. M. LaRocco, G. Bicknell, K. \V;irren, R. Liva. J>jr. Hayes, 
Asst. Coach. Second Row: D. Swan, Mgr.. A. McKinnon. N. Russo. B. Roulston. R. DeVito, J. DiGravio, W. 
Leone, K. Gerrish, R. Pope. B. Dohle, J. Brayshaw. F. Loud, W. Mcintosh, Mr. Lyond. Faculty Mgr.. R. Claflin, 
Third Row: R. Mills, Mgr., Richard Smith. T. Fisher, J. Baumeister, E. DeLuca, R. McBurnie. VV. Jackson, 
R. Walbridge. R. Sherwood, J. Bennett, W. Newcomb, R. Connell, I). Walsh, E. Adams. D. Nicol. 

FOOTBALL 

H ead Coach Harry Arlanson. following his return from his wartime position 
as a lieutenant in Uncle Sam's Navy, and assisted by Leo Hayes and Russell Maz- 
zola, piloted the Maroons to another successful season. Facing one of the toughest 
schedules ever tackled by a Weymouth team and knowing little or nothing about 
his material, Coach Arlanson had his work cut out for him. Spring drills were held 
for the first time in the annals of the school, and fall practice started in mid-August. 
By the time the first game rolled around, Weymouth was sporting a well drilled 
and smooth functioning eleven. Out of the eleven games played, Rindge, Belmont, 
North Quincy, Cambridge Latin, Braintree, Dedham, Watertown and Brockton 
felt the sting of defeat at the hands of the Maroon towners. The victory at Brockton 
was the outstanding game of the year. At Brookline, Weymouth went down to 
defeat in a bitterly contested game. Quincy eked out a victory over an injury 
riddled Weymouth team, while a determined Hingham eleven took advantage of 
Weymouth errors and beat the Maroons in a stunning upset. Although thrice 
beaten, the 1946 team, led by co-captains John Gallian and Gerald Sullivan, was 
never out-classed or out-fought. 



Weymouth 19 


Rindge Tech 7 


Weymouth 36 


Belmont 6 


Weymouth 7 


Brookline 13 


Weymouth 27 


North Quincy 6 


Weymouth 7 


Quincy 12 


Weymouth 26 


Cambridge Latin 


Weymouth 19 


Braintree 6 


Weymouth 13 


Dedham 7 


Weymouth 26 


Watertown 6 


Weymouth 21 


Brockton 12 


Weymouth 


Hingham 7 



Page SevcntV'two *\&-? 



First Row (left to right): W. Rennie, H. Boucher, J. Coveney; Second Row: Coach Wm. Erwin, M. Walsh, 
J. Duca, J. Doyle, Manager, W. Mcintosh; Third Row: J. McCarthy, D. Swan, J. Daly, A. Daniele, G. Sullivan, 
R. Caruso. 

BASKETBALL 

The Weymouth High basketball team was rather a disappointment this year to 
its new coach, Bill Erwin, in view of the fact that he usually produces champion- 
ship teams and that the squad was composed for the most part of veterans. The 
team compiled a record of six victories and nine losses. This does not truly tell the 
worth of the team, because three of the losses were by two points or less. Coach 
Erwin worked hard with no outside co-operation, except the able assistance of Bob 
Ambler, returned war veteran, to mould his boys into a team. The only sign of 
success appeared when the team won three games in a row in the middle of the 
season. 

This year's record was: 



B. C. High 


28 


Weymouth 26 


Weymouth 


38 


Brockton 28 


Weymouth 


36 


Rockland 31 


North Quincy 


46 


Weymouth 18 


Braintree 


33 


Weymouth 32 


Weymouth 


29 


Hingham 28 


Quincy 


35 


Weymouth 33 


North Quincy 53 


Weymouth 28 


Weymouth 


40 


Hingham 32 


Weymouth 


43 


Attleboro 42 


Weymouth 


38 


Quincy 27 


Brockton 


47 


Weymouth 33 


Braintree 


37 


Weymouth 3 1 


Attleboro 


46 


Weymouth 34 


Rockland 


32 


Weymouth 26 



c^Sl, Page Seventy'three 




First Row (left to right) : C. Stone, P. Whittle, G. O'Neill, R. Liva, R. Evans, P. Shepherd, W. Mills, R. 
Estabrook; Second Row: Senior Mgr. C. Briggs. J. Gallian, B. Connell, J. Beaumeister, R. Fenderson, R. 
Rosa, Junior Mgr. J. Pickett; Third Row: R. Alden, A. Clow. N. Balfour. P. Berry. Soph. Mgr. H. Young 
R. Peach, L. Nadell, R. Smith, R. Marr; Fourth Row: W. Keefe, R. McMullin, H. Bates, T. Curran, L. 
Fulton, R. Parsons, W. Jackson, Coach O. Page. 



TRACK 

Wn-„ the State Track Championship to defend, Coach Oral Page has started 
track practice on Legion Field. Most of the members of last year's team are back, 
including Captain Dick Liva. One of the toughest schedules in years has been 
made up. The aim for the year will be to win the State Meet at Newton and the 
South Shore Meet at Weymouth, which is again sponsored by Weymouth. 

The Schedule: 



April 25 Boston College High 

May 6 Hingham at Hingham 

May 13 North Quincy 

May 15 Brookline at Brookline 

May 19 Quincy at Quincy 

May 24 State Meet at Newton 

May 27 Milton at Milton 

May 29 Braintree at Braintree 

June 7 Brockton at Brockton 

June 3 South Shore Meet at Weymouth 



Page Scvcnty'four *\&-? 



Hack Row (left to right): Mr. Page. James Egan, Edward White. Luther Fulton, Kenneth D'Ambrosia, John 
Cassese, (Asst. Mgr.), Russell Trufant. Front Row: William Mills, Donald Swan, Paul Estabrook, Carl 
Bergfurs, Parker Whittle, Melvin Walsh, John Angeline, (Mgr.). 



JL his year's edition of the Weymouth cross-country team, led by Captain Carl 
Bergfors, and coached by Mr. Oral Page, completed another successful season. 
The Marooons were victorious in 8 out of 9 dual meets and tied for fifth in the 
State Meet held at Franklin Park. The week before the team's only loss (to Arling- 
ton) and two weeks before the State Meet, Bob Parson, junior sensation, under- 
went an emergency appendectomy, which hindered the team's chances greatly. 
Since there were no outstanding "stars," every man on the team must be given 
credit for the fine record they compiled, which fact is a tribute to their school 
and coach. 

Low score wins: 




COUNTRY 




Weymouth 15 
Weymouth 23 
Weymouth 18 
Weymouth 21 
Weymouth 16 
Weymouth 20 
Weymouth 15 
Weymouth 17 
Weymouth 32 



Braintree 41 
Rockland 33 
Brookline 39 
Braintree 44 
Brockton 47 



Everett Vocational 35 



Wellesley 46 
Milton 38 



Arlington 25 



c^SV* Page Seventy4we 



Left to right: P. Schlusemeyer, B. Dwyer, J. Walsh, R. O'Neil, M. Loud, C. Hansen, M. Mielbye, M. Keohan. 



Jl his past year the cheer leaders have backed the various athletic teams on to 
success. At football games, basketball games, and track meets, the girls have stood 
behind the teams encouraging the boys. The entire group attended the State 
Track Meet at the Boston Gardens and the first basketball game with B. C. High 
at the arena, while, rain or shine, they were seen at the football games leading 
the crowd in cheers. Besides these various activities the cheerleaders held many 
pep rallies in the auditorium. 

The senior girls leaving this year are Barbara Dwyer and Priscilla Schluse- 
meyer whose places will be filled by two new cheerleaders who, with the rest of 
the squad, will be led by Jean Walsh. 

We all wish Jean and the girls the best of luck in the coming year. 





Page SeventV'six *\&-? 



First Row (left to right): G. Macri, K. Briggs, D. Swan, W. Mcintosh, J. Nesson,; Second Row: J. Pickett, 
E. Binckley. A. Landers, K. Young, A. Monahan; Third Row: J. Mills, T. Healey, R. Peterson, R. Steele, D. 
Nicol, L. Cicchese. 



MANAGERS' CLUB 

TT he Managers' Club includes the managers of all the various sports carried on 
in the high school. It was organized for the purpose of helping the managers of 
these sports to understand better all the problems connected with their work. 

From week to week the coaches, including football Coach Harry Arlanson, 
basketball Coach Bill Erwin, track Coach Oral Page, gave talks on what they 
thought were duties of manager and how they should be fulfilled. 

During the fall Mr. Norman Loud conducted a course in First Aid. 

The officers for the year are: 

Donald Swan, President 

William Mcintosh, Secretary-Treasurer 



c^Vj Page Seventy-seven 



First Row (left to right): K. Thornberg, Miss Gloster, J. Norve; Second Row: E. Forest, R. Chellis, H. 
Nelson, P. Williams, H. Stenberg, M. O'Connell, R. Banks; Third Row: P. Whitford, L. Nyberg. J. McGoldrick, 
E. MacDougall, S. Savola. 

BOOK CLUB 

The Book Club was organized this year under the guidance of Miss Gloster, our 
new librarian. 

Karin Thornberg was elected chairman, and Jeanne Norve, secretary. Books, 
both current and old favorites, were discussed at the meetings each month. 

During the vacations, the club went to several plays in Boston. One was 
"Call Me Mister," a musical revue, and the other was the musical comedy "The 
Red Mill." 

An "Open House" Day was held to introduce the new members to the library. 
Exhibits of different things were displayed. Refreshments were served later. 

We wish to extend our best wishes to next year's club and hope that every 
student who likes to read will make an effort to come to the meetings. 



Page Seventy'eight *\&^ 



First Row (left to right): D. Ther:ault, M. Carr, M. Knight, L. Melville, D. Daniele, J. Barker; Second Row: 
M. Grogan, C. Smith, L. Boyle, P. Williams, N. Cain, A. Daniele, S. Savola, J. Bentley, K. Mahoney; Third 
Row: E. Norris, D. Chellis, S. Mathews, K. Weeks, C. Palmer, P. Baulis, B. Dowd, M. Cushing, P. Rivelle, 
B. LaMontagne, M. Galvin, E. Cain, E. Blackwell; Fourth Row: J. Fopiano, E. Forest, M. Smith, L. Nyberg, 
J. Sheehy, C. Thompson, J. Merten, M. Chubbuck, R. Cass, F. Maddy, B. Baird. 

FRENCH CLUB 

This year "Le Cercle Francais" under the direction of Miss Canning had many 
enjoyable and successful meetings. The meetings which were conducted in French 
were held twice a month. A chairman was appointed each time to take charge of 
the program, which included songs, games, and other kinds of entertainment in 
French. One of the projects of the year was the adoption of a French war orphan, 
Monique Minquet, a girl eight years old whose father was killed in 1940 and whose 
mother died in 1943. A chairman and committee made up two packages, one of 
food and one of clothing, to be sent to the orphan every other week. 

Anthony Daniele, President 
Patricia Williams, Vice-President 
Nancy Cain, Secretary 
Leo Boyle, Treasurer 



c*^V» Page Seventy-nine 




First Row (left to right) : L. Melville, R. Livingstone, G. Butler, K. Thornberg, W. Jackson, R. Peterson, 
D. Rees; Second Row: P. Farr, C. Currier, C. Hollis, H. Lundquist, R. McLellan, Mr. Cleaves, J. Gallagher, 
R. Heitman, E. Healy, G. Leary, J. Barker; Third Row: V. Nelson, P. O'Leary, M. Richards, F. Packard, 
J. Norve, H. Stenberg, B. Messier, P. Williams; Fourth Row: C. Bergfors, R. Clark, E. Wright, R. Marr, J. 
Hawes, J. Merten, L. Boyle, C. Peterson, F. Smith, R. Parsons. 



SKI CLUB 

This past spring brought to a close the first season of the Weymouth High School 
Ski Club. 

The club, under the supervision of Mr. Cleaves, was formed to provide instruc- 
tion and to stimulate interest in skiing. With a membership of approximately 
forty pupils, the club elected George Butler, president; William Jackson, first 
vice-president; William Livingstone, second vice-president; Karin Thornberg, 
secretary; and Roy Peterson, treasurer. Roald Heitmann served as senior technical 
adviser. 

Notwithstanding the deficiency of local snowfall, the group enjoyed many 
outings at the South Shore Country Club and exciting trips on the snow train to 
North Conway, New Hampshire. 

The present members wish to thank the art department, which this year 
designed the club insignia to be given to active members, and wish to extend 
to all students a cordial invitation to membership. 

It is hoped that even better opportunities for the club will prevail next year. 





LEGION ORATORICAL CONTESTANTS 

T he annual oratorical contest, sponsored by Weymouth American Legion Post 
79, was held at Legion Hall on February 4, 1947. 

The subjects of the talks by the contestants were: 

Leo Boyle "Our Living Constitution" 

Robert Goodspeed "The Constitution, A Barrier Against 

Tyranny" 

Lorraine Kendall "The Privileges Of Our American Citizens" 
Michael Smith "Our Constitution, Temple of Liberty" 

Karin Thornberg "The Framing Fathers" 

In a close and spirited contest, Michael J. Smith was judged the winner. He 
later won the county championship. Judges of the contest were: 

Mr. Prescott Brown Weymouth High School 
Miss Muriel Goudey Quincy High School 
Mrs. F. H. McGrath Weymouth School Department 
Mr. Edward Oakman Brainlree High School 
Miss Alice White Weymouth High School 



c^Vi Page Eighty-one 



Class Will 



The grizzled old man had been sitting in the shade of the huge tree for at least 
two hours without getting anything resembling a nibble. Suddenly, something 
digged at the end of his pole. Quickly he reeled it in, excited at first, then 
disappointed. All he had was an odd-looking bottle. He was about to throw it back 
when he noticed something shining from within. Quickly he reached inside and 
pulled out a laded, brownish-yellow scroll. He untied the maroon and gold ribbon 
which held it together and began to read, his eyes widening with each line. 

We, the Senior Class of 1947 of Weymouth High Sc hool, under the obligation of 
the faith and trust now resting in our hands, do hereby undertake to present our 
bequests to the classes which will follow: 

To 211 we leave a squeak neutralizer to take care of the squeaking chairs. To 
Miss White we leave a traffic dummy to insure her safety. 

To 212 we will locks on the doors to save wear and tear on; Mr. Kelly. To Mr. 
Kelly we will an adding machine to make bookkeeping easier for him and his 
students. 

To 216 we bequeath a robot to take care of the blackboards. To Miss Canning 
we bequeath an elevated chair to allow her to see the students as they sneak away 
to walk around the school in the morning. 

To 217 we leave a set of "walkie-talkies" to keep law and order. To Mr. Cleaves 
we leave either a higher door or a lower floor. 

To 218 for future classes, we will a gilded waste basket in which to deposit gum; 
and, for the mistress herself, to save her voice, a record which repeats, "Come now, 
seniors!" 

To 304 we bequeath the quality of patience, with the type room on one end and 
the lab on the other. To Miss Silverman, we bequeath a swinging door between 
303 and 304; to Miss Vining, we bequeath a new heater for 301 to help on those 
cold winter days. 

To Mr. Whittle we leave an atomic bomb to quiet the assemblies. 

To Mr. Lyons we will an electric eye to determine whether or not excuses are 
written by the parents or by the pupils. 

To the juniors we bequeath all the problems and happy times of graduation year. 

To the sophomores we leave the pledge to continue the good sportsmanship 
shown at Weymouth High School. 

To the freshmen we bequeath the relief of becoming sophomores, so that they 
will no longer have to be called the pea-green freshmen. 

To room 3 and Mr. Whittemore we will an X-ray machine to detect early lunch- 
eaters behind raised desk covers. 

To Mr. Whipple we leave a turnstile to keep the boys from crowding the office 
the first thing in the morning. 



c^V> Page Eighty-three 



To the automobile shop and Mr. Baton we bequeath a pair of roller skates to 
help him get around the shop faster. 

To Mr. Sherwood, the cabinet and carpentry shop we will the dream that some 
day they will have a new dust-collecting system. 

To Mr. Clark and the sheet metal shop we leave one sheet of stainless steel to 
compensate for that used in the making of bracelets. 

To Mr. Boland we bequeath the gazelle boy to run errands for him. 

To Mr. Duncan we will all of our old excuses so that in his spare time he may 
print a work of fiction. 

To Mr. Mahn we leave a box of sleeping tablets so that he won't lie awake nights, 
worrying how the boys are making out in their work after graduation. 

To Mr. Klay we bequeath an inch worm to do his measuring in the mechanical 
drafting class. 

To Mr. Nelson we will a robot to sweep up his room after his sophomores leave- 
each period. 

ToMr. Lynch we leave two strong boys to carry the large barrel out to the 
incinerator. 

Our final request is that future graduating classes of Weymouth High School 
will measure in every respect to the high qualities of good school citizens that 
characterize the Class of 1947. 

The old man sighed, recalling fond memories of that class of classes, his class. For 
a moment after reading the scroll he sat quietly smiling, reminiscently. Then 
he resumed his fishing, happy with his day's catch. 



Page Eighty'four r \&-' 



WOODLAND STUDIO 

UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT 
58 Commercial St. Weymouth, Mass. Tel. Wey. 1464 

Children, Weddings, School, 
Church and Family Groups 
a Specialty 



J. S. PARKER JONES 

58 Commercial St., Weymouth 

Wey. 1464 



1757 WASHINGTON STREET 
CANTON, MASS. 
Canton 0259-M 



Weymouth Taxi Service 

SOUTH WEYMOUTH EAST WEYMOUTH 

Weymouth Weymouth 

1933 1944 
GREEN CAB 

SOUTH WEYMOUTH TAXI SERVICE 
EAST WEYMOUTH TAXI SERVICE 

24 -HOUR SERVICE 



93 PLEASANT STREET 844 BROAD STREET 

SOUTH WEYMOUTH EAST WEYMOUTH 



fBl, Page Eighty-five 



SPEAR S 

Flower Shop 


DONOVAN 
DRUG CO. 


Member Florists' 


"The 
Service Stores" 


1 eiegrapn JL/ciivcry 
Association 


RROAD STRFET 
EAST WEYMOUTH 


WEYMOUTH and HINGHAM 


Tel. Wey. 0049 


Delivery Service 


Wey. 2045-W Wey. 2045-R 


Asphalt 
Rubber Tile 


Coyle 
Auto Service 

FRED J. COYLE, Prop. 


Rugs 

Broadloom 
Johnson's Wax 

Linoleum f~>\ -g 
WallCovering (jeiier<U 
Counter Work 

Congoleums FloOritlP 

JL A VV/JL 111 >' 

Co. 

FLOORING 
CONTRACTORS 


I'll T T 

Cadillac Hearses 
Limousines and Flower Cars 




ELECTRICAL . 
APPLIANCES T 


WEYMOUTH 


745 BROAD STREET 
Youngstown EAS T WEYMOUTH 


Day Service Night Service 


Pressed Steel Tel. Wey. 1039-W 
KltChenS and 3524 



Page Eighty-six 



Compliments of 



LOVELL BUS CO. 



Tel. Wey. 2150 



BERNARD G. TIRRELL 

Jeweler 



GRADUATION GIFTS 



71 WASHINGTON STREET WEYMOUTH 88, MASS. 



c^SV> Page Eighty'Seven 



Arthur H. Desmond 


C.L.McGAW 


INSURANCE 
of 

ALL TYPES 


NEWSDEALER 

jinn 

STATIONER 






46 BEAL STREET 
NORTH WEYMOUTH, MASS. 
Weymouth 1528 


SOUTH WEYMOUTH 
MASS. 


Compliments of 

FRANK NESS 


BROWN'S 




MARKET 


COLUMBIAN SQUARE 




SOUTH WEYMOUTH 




JUNCTION ROUTE 3 and 18 




WEYMOUTH 








PARK AVE. and ROUTE 128 
SOUTH WEYMOUTH 


84 PLEASANT STREET 
SOUTH WEYMOUTH 



Page Eighty'eight *\J^> 



SPORTING GOODS 

Equipment for 
Every Sport 

WILLIAM WESTLAND & CO. 

1555 HANCOCK STREET 
QUINCY, MASSACHUSETTS 



Best Wishes to the 
Senior Class 

From Mr. Lobster at His Best 

CAIN'S 

NORTH WEYMOUTH 



c^V, Page Eighty'nine 



• 


SCHAFER'S 


Compliments of 


fAMFRA CROP 


CLARK'S 


VjilIIlCIcla ••• 1 111 11 


MARKET 


Supplies ... Movies 






A 

T 






MADF TO ORDFR 






COLUMBIAN SQUARE 






22 COMMERCIAL STREET 


SOUTH WEYMOUTH 


WI-'YMOI ITH T ANniNC 




Tel. Braintree 1995-J 


Compliments of 






Compliments of 


-m — ^ -4 -g . -g ~T -j 

hlbndge JNash 


DONDERO 


Drug Co. 


STORE 


WILLIAM B. NASH 




Reg. Pharm. 




COLUMBIAN SQUARE 




SOUTH WEYMOUTH 


COLUMBIAN SQUARE 


Tel. Wey. 2388 


SOUTH WEYMOUTH 



Page Ninety t \2r^ 



PLYMOUTH ROCK 



Sealtest 
Ice Cream 

Served Exclusively in Our Cafeteria 



I. BLOOM & SONS 



MARKET 



Serving the Public for 35 Years 



PHONE WEY. 0248 



c^V, Page Ninety'one 



Lots of 


Compliments of 


GOOD LUCK 




to you 


RESTAURANT 


YOUNG 




GRADUATES 


+ 








5 UNION STREET 


Olden's Pharmacy 


COLUMBIAN SQUARE 
SOUTH WEYMOUTH 


COUTH WEYMOUTH 




CIPULLO'S 


CAMEO 


I. G. A. STORE 


DRFSS SHOP 


JL 

v 




DEPOT SQUARE 


COLUMBIAN SQUARE 


SOUTH WEYMOUTH 


SOUTH WEYMOUTH 



Page Ninety-two °VJV 



Compliments of 



T/ £fr6vift Gap/? s/we 



EAST WEYMOUTH, MASS. 



UNITED 
BURNER SERVICE 

SILENT GLOW 
OIL BURNERS 

Heating Stokers 
Electrical Appliances 
Practical Shower and 
Wedding Gifts 
Records 

JACKSON SQUARE 
EAST WEYMOUTH 
Tel. Wey. 1170 



Compliments of 

JIGG'S 
SODA BAR 

and 

VARIETY STORE 

THOMAS' CORNER 
NORTH WEYMOUTH 
Wey. 0721 



£-^V» Page Ninety-three 



JESSEMAN'S 
HARDWARE 


C.C. SHEPHERD 


STORE 


FUNERAL 




HOME 


1 COLUMBIAN SQUARE 
SOUTH WEYMOUTH 


SOUTH WEYMOUTH 


Compliments of 


ORCUTT'S 


Dr. Jordan P. Sandman 

D.D.S. 

+ 


FRESH FROZEN 
FROSTED 
FOODS 

Fancy Groceries 
Self Service 

T 


COLUMBIAN STREET 
SOUTH WEYMOUTH 


DEPOT SQUARE 
SOUTH WEYMOUTH 
Wcy. 3126- W 



Page Ninety-four r V&^ 





KITCHEN WARE 

X m. X X VJ X X J J ± 1 TT i 111 J J 


Congratulations 


and 


Garden Supplies 


IVJ LUC 


Class of 1947 


CARMOTE 


Paints & Varnishes 




A 




Artnur ivi. justice 


from the 


HARDWARE 




782 BROAD STREET 


JbIN 1 ls\n 


EAST WEYMOUTH 
Telephone Weymouth 0773-M 


PERSONNEL j 




• 


Compliments of 


at 


JASAN 






THEATRE 


REMICK'S 






EAST WEYMOUTH 




Tel. Wey. 2215 



c^SV, Page Ninety-five 



Lincoln Square 
Delicatessen 


WEYMOUTH 
MUSIC SHOP 


Grille and Fountain 
service 


All Your Favorite Tunes 
on Popular Records 


GROCERIES 


and Sheet Music 


T 


"Come in and Browse Around" 


186 WASHINGTON STREET 


NEXT TO WEYMOUTH THEATRE 


Tel. 2818 


Wey. 2205 




HADADIAN'S 


Bring Your Prescriptions 


SHOE REBUILDING 


to REIDY'S 


771 BROAD STREET 


DRUG STORE 


EAST WEYMOUTH, MASS. 
Tel. Wey. 0908 


839 BROAD STREET 




EAST WEYMOUTH 




Dewey Santacrocc Fran White 





Page Ninety'Six r \3±> 



Compliments 



of 



Paul A. Doucette 



Compliments of 



SOUTH SHORE 
PONTIAC, INC. 



PONTIAC SALES AND SERVICE 

"At the Herring Run" 

1407-11 COMMERCIAL STREET 
EAST WEYMOUTH 
Wey. 1421 or 3530 



Compliments 



of 



A FRIEND 



When Placing or 
Renewing 

INSURANCE 



Remember 



CHARLES G. JORDAN 



9 FRONT STREET 

WEYMOUTH 
Tel. Wey. 0427 



c^V> Page Ninety'Seven 



Holbrookes Inc. 


SOUTH SHORE 
INSURANCE AGENCY 


Town and Country Fashions 
for Misses and Women 


Established 1870 

ADDIE L. CHUBBUCK 


Bathing Suits 

$ 3 98 to $ 7 98 


insurance 

of 


All Kinds of 


Every Description 


Play Clothes 


45 WASHINGTON SQUARE 


EAST BRAINTREE 
Tel. Bra. 1821 


WEYMOUTH 
Tel. 0098 


McMorrow Bros. 


BELLINGHAM 
HARDWARE CO. 


MARKET 


INC. 


and 




BAKERY 


Always at 




Your Service 


EAST WEYMOUTH 


WASHINGTON SQUARE 


Tel. Wey. 0043—0044 


WEYMOUTH 



Page Ninety'eight 'Xa^' 



E. F. P. BURNS, Inc. 




CAPS AND GOWNS 




100 Summer St., Boston, Mass. 


Congratulations 


We Buy Anything . . . 


Entire contents of your 


to the 


home, attic, garage, or 




storeroom. 


Class of 1947 






CURIOSITY 


SHOP 


FOLEY'S 


196 WASHINGTON STREET 


SANDWICHES 


LINCOLN SQUARE, WEYMOUTH 


Tel. Wey. 1797 -R 


Howard A. Dempsey James M. Dempsey 




Class of 1939 Class of 1938 



Page Ninety'nine 



VwUlTipillTlCnCb UL 


Compliments of 


Dr, Donald F. Whittle 




D. M. D. 


I UCTD 




and 




LOVE 


WASHINGTON SQUARE 


WEYMOUTH LANDING 








Compliments 






P. BREGOR, Dealer 


of 




The best in cosmetics 




patent medicines, baby 




supplies and tobacco at 


STORES 


the lowest prices. 








WEYMOUTH LANDING 




and WHITMAN 



Page One Hundred 'X^? 



Most Popular Member 
of EVERY Class 


Smith's Book Store 

WEYMOUTH LANDING 




GREETING CARDS 

Hallmark and Rustcraft 




STATIONERY 

tor school and orhce 


GLASSWARE 

Fostoria and Westmoreland 


also FAMOUS MAKE SHOES 
at FACTORY PRICES 


FOUNTAIN PENS 


Factory Shoe Store 


for Men and Women 
Waterman, Moore, Eversharp 


Inc. 

Opposite Stetson Shoe 
South Weymouth, Mass. 


Miscellaneous Gifts 

for Every Occassion 


Wey. 0901 


Tel. Wey. 2605-R-2605-W 


MARY "D" 


GRIND ALL 


FOOD SHOP 


RADIO 
SERVICE 


Home Made Pastrv 
Bread and Rolls 

Specializing in Handmade Doughnuts 
+ 


Authorized Dealer G. E. 
and Howard Radios 

Sales and Service on all 
Radios and Electrical 
Appliances 

♦ 


207 WASHINGTON STREET 
WEYMOUTH, MASS. 


890 BROAD STREET 
EAST WEYMOUTH MASS. 



c^Vj Page One Hundred One 



Harry S. Cummings 

Registered Pharmacist 


Earl C. Fowler 


Weymouth Landing 
Druggist 


INSURANCE 


" We will not be knowingly 
undersold" 




BRAINTREE TOWN PRESCRIPTIONS 
MAY BE FILLED AT 
OUR STORE 


776 BROAD STREET 
EAST WEYMOUTH 


ALEMIAN'S 

Imported and Domestic 


Compliments 


GROCERIES 


of 


Delicatessen Friut 
Candy Ice Cream 


tfftttTX 




"The 

-A. llv 


718 BROAD STREET 
EAST WEYMOUTH 


Wonder Store" 



Page One Hundred Two c^SVj 



Duncan MacKellar 


Compliments of 


M. P. GAREY AGENCY 




INSURANCE 
of 


PAUL'S 

VARTFTY STORF 


Every Description 








JACKSON SQUARE 


208 WASHINGTON STREET 
WEYMOUTH, MASS. 


EAST WEYMOUTH 
Tel. Wey. 1170 


Jackson bquare 
Pharmacy 


HELEN'S 

Beauty Studio 


The 




REXALL 




STORE 




ICE CREAM LUNCHEONETTE 




804-806 BROAD STREET 
EAST WEYMOUTH, MASS. 
Tel. Wey. 2136-W 


i i \ \ / a pt tt\ T/~ ,,- r'/^\N. t err* r*T~" i * 

41 WASHINGTON STREET 


WEYMOUTH LANDING 
Tel. Wey. 3885 



c-^Vj Page One Hundred Three 



BY THE CREATORS OF "COVERMARK" 





not a blemish in sight 
thanks to 




conceals all blemishes 



If you're going to be party-bound, be 
sure to keep a Spot-Stik ptase -handy. (You 
never know when an impertinent pimple might 
pop up to mar a super evening!) Conceal any skin discoloration — large or 
small— completely, instantly, with just a touch of this little flesh-tone stick. Non-irritating, 
—actually soothing! Accepted for advertising in Journal of American Medical Ass'n. Be 
sure to get your Spot-Stik today. Don't borrow one— use your own! 
Spot-Stik -$1.25. Exempt from Federal Tax. 

// not available at your favorite drug or department store, send $1.25 
and specify your skin tone: light, medium, or dark. 



mmmm 1 



DEPT. G, 551 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK 17, N. Y. 




IN WEYMOUTH 

DONOVAN DRUG CORP. 

WEYMOUTH LANDING 



C. C. HEARN DRUGS, INC. 

NORTH WEYMOUTH 



Page One Hundred Four c^V.